Self-Knowledge

ISBN-10: 0415405262
ISBN-13: 9780415405263
Edition: 2011
Authors: Brie Gertler
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Description: How do you know your own thoughts and feelings? Do we have ‘privileged access’ to our own minds? Does introspection provide a grasp of a thinking self or ‘I’?The problem of self-knowledge is one of the most fascinating in all of philosophy  More...

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Book details

List price: $41.95
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Routledge
Publication date: 1/25/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 328
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.100
Language: English

How do you know your own thoughts and feelings? Do we have ‘privileged access’ to our own minds? Does introspection provide a grasp of a thinking self or ‘I’?The problem of self-knowledge is one of the most fascinating in all of philosophy and has crucial significance for the philosophy of mind and epistemology. In this outstanding introduction Brie Gertler assesses the leading theoretical approaches to self-knowledge, explaining the work of many of the key figures in the field: from Descartes and Kant, through to Bertrand Russell and Gareth Evans, as well as recent work by Tyler Burge, David Chalmers, William Lycan and Sydney Shoemaker.Beginning with an outline of the distinction between self-knowledge and self-awareness and providing essential historical background to the problem, Gertler addresses specific theories of self-knowledge such as the acquaintance theory, the inner sense theory, and the rationalist theory, as well as leading accounts of self-awareness. The book concludes with a critical explication of the dispute between empiricist and rationalist approaches.Including helpful chapter summaries, annotated further reading and a glossary, Self Knowledgeis essential reading for those interested in philosophy of mind, epistemology, and personal identity.

Acknowledgements
Introduction
The topic of this book: self-knowledge and self-awareness
Self-knowledge
The problem of self-knowledge
Theories of self-knowledge
Self-awareness
Some philosophical implications of these theories
Self-knowledge and the distinctiveness of the mental
Self-knowledge and epistemic justification
Self-knowledge and perceptual knowledge
Self-awareness and personal identity
Outline of the book
Summary
Further reading
Historical background
Introduction
The Creeks: the importance of knowing one's nature
Descartes: self-knowledge as an epistemic foundation
Introspection and the doctrine of innate ideas
Self-knowledge and epistemic internalism
Self-knowledge and epistemic foundationalism
Knowledge of the self and mind-body dualism
Locke: the inner sense theory
Inner sense and knowledge
Inner sense and consciousness
Inner sense and personal identity
Kant: self-knowledge and rational agency
Wittgenstein and Ryle: doubts about self-knowledge
Wittgenstein's doubts: privacy and epistemic significance
Wittgensteinian alternatives: the default authority and expressivist views
Ryle: self-knowledge as theorizing
Summary
Further reading
The nature and scope of (purportedly) special self-knowledge
Introduction
Self-knowledge as special, relative to other sorts of knowledge
Self-knowledge as especially secure, epidemically
Self-knowledge as achieved through a unique epistemic method
Self-knowledge as special in a nonepistemic way
Limits to the domain of privileged access
Character traits, affective forecasting, and causal sources of actions and attitudes
Moods and emotions
Dispositional beliefs and desires
Boghossian's puzzle
What remains of privileged access?
Summary
Further reading
The acquaintance theory of self-knowledge
Introduction
Russell's acquaintance theory
Contemporary acquaintance theories
The acquaintance thesis
Davidson's challenge
Answering Davidson's challenge
Problems for acquaintance theories
The speckled hen
The problem of conceptualization
A proposed solution
Pruning the epistemic appearances
An account of phenomenal concepts amenable to acquaintance
Wittgenstein's "privacy" objection
Williamson's luminosity objection
The scope of the acquaintance theory
The acquaintance theory: costs and benefits
Summary
Further reading
The inner sense theory of self-knowledge
Introduction
Contemporary versions of the inner sense theory
Armstrong's version of the inner sense theory
Lycan's version of the inner sense theory
The objection from bruteness
The asymmetry objection
Shoemaker's objections
Self-blindness regarding pains
Self-blindness regarding beliefs: first argument
Self-blindness regarding beliefs: second argument
Defending the inner sense theory from Shoemaker's objections
Inner sense and the HOP theory of consciousness
A related view: Dretske's displaced perception account
The inner sense theory: costs and benefits
Summary
Further reading
The rationalist theory of self-knowledge
Introduction
Rationalism: Burge and Moran
Critical reasoning as a normative enterprise
Critical reasoning and self-knowledge
Reinterpreting the problem of self-knowledge
Is rationalism intended as an epistemic theory?
Objection: rationalism cannot explain the epistemic dimension of self-knowledge
Surge's epistemology of self-knowledge
Moran's epistemology of self-knowledge
The transparency method as an epistemic source
Related theories
Gallois' rationalism
Shoemaker's constitutivism
Neo-expressivism
The rationalist theory: costs and benefits
Summary
Further reading
Awareness of the self
Introduction
What is self-awareness?
Hume's thesis: the self is not introspectible
Awareness of oneself as a subject vs. as an object
Special features of self-awareness
Essential indexical
Immunity to error through misidentification
The introspective account
Introspective awareness of the self
The introspective account and Hume's bundle theory
Can the introspective account explain subject self-awareness?
The deflationary view
The situated subject account
The rational agency account
Sensory accounts
Evans's sensory account
Bermuda's sensory account
Do these accounts genuinely disagree?
Summary
Further reading
The dispute between empiricism and rationalism: a diagnosis
Introduction
The distinction between empiricism and rationalism
The rationalist's burden
Rationality and transparency
Two kinds of attitudes
The limits of transparency
Explaining transparency
Rationality and entitlement
The epistemic distinctiveness of critical self-knowledge
The rational agency account of self-awareness
Diagnosing the dispute between empiricism and rationalism
Summary
Further reading
Glossary
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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