Media Technology and Society A History from the Telegraph to the Internet

ISBN-10: 041514230X
ISBN-13: 9780415142304
Edition: 1998
Authors: Brian Winston
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Description: How are media born? How do they change? And how do they change us? Media Technology and Societyoffers a comprehensive account of the history of communications technologies, from the printing press to the internet. Brian Winston argues that the  More...

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Book details

List price: $43.95
Copyright year: 1998
Publisher: Routledge
Publication date: 5/29/1998
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 392
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.540
Language: English

How are media born? How do they change? And how do they change us? Media Technology and Societyoffers a comprehensive account of the history of communications technologies, from the printing press to the internet. Brian Winston argues that the development of new media, from the telegraph and the telephone to computers, satellite and virtual reality, is the product of a constant play-off between social necessity and suppression: the unwritten law by which new technologies are introduced into society only insofar as their disruptive potential is limited. Winston's fascinating account examines the role played by individuals such as Alexander Graham Bell, Gugliemo Marconi, John Logie Baird, Boris Rozing and Charles Babbage, and challenges the popular myth of the present-day "information revolution."

List of figures
Acknowledgements
A storm from paradise -- technological innovation, diffusion and suppression
The Information Revolution as hyperbole
Modelling change
'Invention'
Propagating sound at considerable distances
The telegraph
Scientific competence to ideation: static electrical telegraphs
Prototypes, necessity and 'invention': dynamic electrical telegraphs
Suppression and diffusion: owning the telegraph
Before the speaking telephone
Scientific competence: the telephone
Ideation: speech transmitted by electricity
Prototypes: electrical speaking telephones before 1877
The capture of sound
Supervening necessity: the telephone and the office
'Invention': creating the telephone to order
Suppression and diffusion: the telephone after 1900
'Inventing' a spin-off: the record
The vital spark and fugitive pictures
Wireless and radio
Scientific competence to ideation: from spark to wireless
Necessity, diffusion and suppression: ironclads and telegrams
'Invention': from wireless telegraphy to radio
Ideation and necessity: the idea of broadcasting
Suppression and diffusion: valves/tubes, FM and cartels
Living with radio
Mechanically scanned television
Scientific competence: light and electricity
Ideation: faxes and 'fugitive pictures'
Prototypes: mechanical scanning
Electronically scanned television
Invention I: electronic scanning
Invention II: alternative electronic scanning
Necessity and suppression: entertainment
Suppressing television: 1935-48
Suppressing television: 1948 to the mid-1950s
Television spin-offs and redundancies
Spin-offs and redundancies: VCRs, CDs et al.
Redundancy: 1125-line analogue television
Inventions for casting up sums very pretty
Mechanising calculation
Scientific competence I: 'thinking machines'
Scientific competence II: Babbage
Scientific competence III: calculators -- mechanical to electrical
Prototypes: electro-mechanical calculators
The first computers
Electronic prototypes I: ENIAC and 'the firing table crisis'
Electronic prototypes II: Colossus vs. Enigma
Ideation: 'the store'
Supervening social necessity: the H-Bomb
'Invention': incunabula
Suppressing the main frames
No buyers
No languages
No babies
The integrated circuit
Suppression (cont.): ignoring solid state electronics
Scientific competence: cat's whiskers to transistor
Transistors vs. valves
Ideation and prototype: the integrated circuit
'Invention': the microprocessor
The coming of the microcomputer
Suppression revisited: the computer industry
Diffusion and spin-offs: PC production
The intricate web of trails, this grand system
The beginnings of networks
The first wired network
The telephone network
Networks and recording technologies
Broadcasting networks
Digression: broadcasting networks and recording technologies
Pre-satellite international radio links
International wired links
Communications satellites
Scientific competence and ideation: the communications satellites
Prototypes: low and medium orbits
Social necessity and invention: the geostationary satellite
Suppression: the international network
The satellite era
Domestic satellites
Direct broadcast satellites
Cable television
The return of the wire: cable television
The impact of domestic satellites
The impact on broadcast television
The Internet
Prototypes and ideation: computer networks
From necessity to diffusion: ARPANET to Internet
The pile of debris -- from the Boulevard des Capucins to the Leningradsky Prospect
Notes
References
Index

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