Emerson's Prose and Poetry

ISBN-10: 0393967921
ISBN-13: 9780393967920
Edition: 2001
List price: $14.00 Buy it from $7.80
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: Printed on the familiar onionskin that reduces the 800 pages to a manageable size, the volume assembled by Morris (Bucknell U.) and Porte (Cornell U.) is a comprehensive resource for students and scholars alike, containing a generous selection of  More...

New Starting from $26.77
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
You could win $10,000

Get an entry for every item you buy, rent, or sell.

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Italian Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Portuguese Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Spanish Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
German Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $14.00
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company, Incorporated
Publication date: 3/21/2001
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 816
Size: 9.50" wide x 6.75" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.298
Language: English

Printed on the familiar onionskin that reduces the 800 pages to a manageable size, the volume assembled by Morris (Bucknell U.) and Porte (Cornell U.) is a comprehensive resource for students and scholars alike, containing a generous selection of Emerson's sermons, lectures, essays, addresses, and poems as well as excerpts from his journals, notebooks, and correspondence. The second half of the book provides contextual background in the form of writings by his contemporaries, including Madame de Stael, William Wordsworth, and Sampson Reed and 14 critical interpretations by 20th-century writers. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR

Known primarily as the leader of the philosophical movement transcendentalism, which stresses the ties of humans to nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson, American poet and essayist, was born in Boston in 1803. From a long line of religious leaders, Emerson became the minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in 1829. He left the church in 1832 because of profound differences in interpretation and doubts about church doctrine. He visited England and met with British writers and philosophers. It was during this first excursion abroad that Emerson formulated his ideas for Self-Reliance. He returned to the United States in 1833 and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. He began lecturing in Boston. His first book, Nature (1836), published anonymously, detailed his belief and has come to be regarded as his most significant original work on the essence of his philosophy of transcendentalism. The first volume of Essays (1841) contained some of Emerson's most popular works, including the renowned Self-Reliance. Emerson befriended and influenced a number of American authors including Henry David Thoreau. It was Emerson's practice of keeping a journal that inspired Thoreau to do the same and set the stage for Thoreau's experiences at Walden Pond. Emerson married twice (his first wife Ellen died in 1831 of tuberculosis) and had four children (two boys and two girls) with his second wife, Lydia. His first born, Waldo, died at age six. Emerson died in Concord on April 27, 1882 at the age of 78 due to pneumonia and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, Massachusetts.

Saundra Morris is Associate Professor of English and Senior Fellow, Social Justice College at Bucknell University, where she has taught since 1995. She is a Stanley J. Karhl Fellow of Literary Manuscripts at Houghton Library, Harvard University.

Preface
Acknowledgments
A Note on the Texts
Abbreviations
The Texts of Emerson's Prose and Poetry
Sermons
I. [Pray Without Ceasing], 1 Thessalonians 5:17, July 25, 1826
XXXIX. [Summer], Psalms 74:16-17, June 13, 1829
XC. [Trust Yourself], Matthew 16:26, October 3, 1830
CLXII. [The Lord's Supper], Romans 14:17, September 9, 1832
Nature
Selected Early Addresses and Lectures
The American Scholar
An Address Delivered before the Senior Class in Divinity College, Cambridge, July 15, 1838
The Method of Nature
The Transcendentalist
From Essays: First Series
History
Self-Reliance
Compensation
Spiritual Laws
The Over-Soul
Circles
From Essays: Second Series
The Poet
Experience
Politics
New England Reformers
From Representative Men
Montaigne, or the Skeptic
Shakspeare, or the Poet
From The Conduct of Life
Fate
Power
Illusions
From Letters and Social Aims
From Poetry and Imagination
Quotation and Originality
From The Dial
The Editors to the Reader
Thoughts on Modern Literature
Miscellanies on His Contemporaries and His Times
From An Address... on... the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies
Address to the Citizens of Concord on the Fugitive Slave Law
From Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli
Thoreau
Abraham Lincoln
From Historic Notes of Life and Letters in New England
Selected Poetry
From Poems
The Sphinx
Each and All
The Problem
The Visit
Uriel
Hamatreya
The Rhodora
The Humble-Bee
The Snow-Storm
Fable
Ode, Inscribed to W. H. Channing
Give All to Love
Thine Eyes Still Shined
Eros
The Apology
Merlin, I
Merlin, II
Bacchus
Blight
Threnody
Concord Hymn
From May-Day and Other Pieces
From May-Day
Brahma
Nemesis
Boston Hymn
Voluntaries
Days
The Chartist's Complaint
The Titmouse
Sea-Shore
Two Rivers
Waldeinsamkeit
Terminus
From Elements
Art
Worship
From Quatrains
Memory
From Translations
Song of Seid Nimetollah of Kuhistan
Others
Grace
Cupido
["Let Me Go Where E'er I Will"]
["Ever the Rock of Ages Melts"]
From Journals and Notebooks
From Correspondence
To William Emerson, Concord, November 10, 1814
To Mary Moody Emerson, Cambridge, September 23, 1826
To William Emerson, Charleston, January 6 and 9, 1827
To Mary Moody Emerson, St. Augustine, March 15? 1827
To the Second Church and Society in Boston, Cambridge, January 30, 1829
To the Proprietors of the Second Church, Boston, September 11, 1832
To the Second Church and Society, Boston, December 22, 1832
To Edward Bliss Emerson, Boston, December 22, 1833
To Edward Bliss Emerson, Newton, May 31, 1834
To Lydia Jackson, Concord, January 24, 1835
To Lydia Jackson, Concord, February 1, 1835
To Thomas Carlyle, Concord, September 17, 1836
To William Emerson, Concord, October 31, 1836
To Martin Van Buren, Concord, April 23, 1838
For Henry David Thoreau, Concord, May 2, 1838
To Thomas Carlyle, Concord, May 10, 1838
To Amos Bronson Alcott, Concord, June 28, 1838
To Henry Ware Jr., Concord, July 28, 1838
To Henry Ware Jr., Concord, October 8, 1838
To Thomas Carlyle, Concord, October 17, 1838
To James Freeman Clarke, Concord, December 7, 1838
To Margaret Fuller, Concord, August 4, 1840
To Margaret Fuller, Concord, October 24, 1840
To Margaret Fuller, Concord, March 14, 1841
To Mary Moody Emerson, Concord, September 21, 1841
To Mary Moody Emerson, Concord, January 28, 1842
To Margaret Fuller, Concord, January 28, 1842
To Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, Concord, January 28, 1842
To Caroline Sturgis, Concord, February 4, 1842
To Lidian Emerson, Providence, February 10, 1842
To Lidian Emerson, Castleton, Staten Island, March 1, 1842
To Margaret Fuller, Concord, June 7, 1843
To Charles Anderson Dana, Concord, October 18, 1843
To Margaret Fuller, Concord, December 17, 1843
To Christopher Pearse Cranch, Concord, June 7, 1844
To Thomas Carlyle, Concord, December 31, 1844
To William J. Rotch, Concord, November 17, 1845
To the Corporation of Harvard University, Concord, June 25, 1846
To William Henry Furness, Concord, August 6, 1847
To Henry David Thoreau, Manchester, December 2, 1847
To Lidian Emerson, London, March 8 and 10, 1848
To William Emerson, Concord, February 10, 1850
To Paulina W. Davis, Concord, September 18, 1850
To Wendell Phillips, Concord, February 19, 1853
To Caroline Sturgis Tappan, Concord, July 22, 1853
To Walt Whitman, Concord, July 21, 1855
To Thomas Carlyle, Concord, May 6, 1856
To Henry David Thoreau, Concord, May 11, 1858
To William Henry Seward, Buffalo, January 12, 1863
To Emma Lazarus, Concord, February 24, 1868
To Emma Lazarus, Concord, April 14, 1868
To Emma Lazarus, Concord, July 9, 1869
To Emma Lazarus, Concord, August 23, 1869
To Emma Lazarus, Concord, August 19, 1870
To Lidian Emerson, the Wyoming, October 31 and November 2, 1872
To Emma Lazarus, Concord, July 22, 1876
To George Stewart Jr., Concord, January 22, 1877
Contexts
Transcendentalism
From On Germany
Prospectus to The Recluse
From Coleridge's Literary Character
Genius
Reviews and Impressions
Caricatures
Ballad of the Abolition Blunder-buss
An Illustrated Criticism
From Nature--A Prose Poem
The New School in Literature and Religion
[Emerson's Essays]
Mr. Emerson's Lecture
Emerson's Essays
From The Old Manse
From A Fable for Critics
From A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers
From North America
From Journals
To R. W. E.
Emerson
From Emerson
Emerson
Address at the Emerson Centenary in Concord
Ralph Waldo Emerson
From Model Americans
On Emerson
Emerson
Criticism
Has Emerson a Future?
Emerson's Tragic Sense
New England's Transcendentalism: Native or Imported?
The Problem of Emerson
From The Achievement of the Poems: "Artful Thunder"
"Quotation and Originality"
Emerson and the Persistence of the Commodity
Ralph Waldo Emerson
From The Philosopher in American Life
From The Emersonian Prehistory of American Pragmatism
From Virtue's Hero
From Poetry and Pragmatism
The Heart Has Its Jubilees
Through a Thousand Voices: Emerson's Poetry and "The Sphinx"
Ralph Waldo Emerson: A Chronology
Selected Bibliography
Index of Titles and First Lines of Poems

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×