Women's Rights Emerges Within the Anti-Slavery Movement, 1830-1870 A Brief History with Documents

ISBN-10: 0312228198
ISBN-13: 9780312228194
Edition: 2000
List price: $110.00
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
You could win $10,000

Get an entry for every item you buy, rent, or sell.

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Careers in Legal Assisting Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $110.00
Copyright year: 2000
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date: 6/17/2000
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 240
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.792
Language: English

Foreword
Preface
List of Illustrations
Introduction: "Our Rights as Moral Beings"
Prelude: Breaking Away from Slave Society
Seeking a Voice: Garrisonian Abolitionist Women, 1831-1833
Women Claim the Right to Act: Angelina and Sarah Grimke Speak in New York, July 1836-May 1837
Redefining the Rights of Women: Angelina and Sarah Grimke Speak in Massachusetts, Summer 1837
The Antislavery Movement Splits Over the Question of Women's Rights, 1837-1840
An Independent Women's Rights Movement Is Born, 1840-1858
Epilogue: The New Movement Splits Over the Question of Race, 1850-1869
The Documents
Seeking a Voice: Garrisonian Abolitionist Women, 1831-1833
Life and Letters, 1884
Constitution of the Afric-American Female Intelligence Society, 1831
Religion and the Pure Principles of Morality, 1831
Lecture Delivered at the Franklin Hall, Boston, 1832
Farewell Address to Her Friends in the City of Boston, 1833
Women Claim the Right to Act: Angelina and Sarah Grimke Speak in New York, July 1836-May 1837
Petition Form for Women, 1834
Appeal to the Christian Women of the South, 1836
Letter to Jane Smith, New York, December 17, 1836
Letter to Jane Smith, New York January 20, 1837
Letter to Jane Smith, New York, February 4, 1837
Letter to Sarah Douglass, Newark, N.J., February 22, 1837
Letter to Sarah Douglass, New York City, April 3, 1837
Letter to Angelina Grimke, Philadelphia, April 15, 1837
An Appeal to the Women of the Nominally Free States, 1837
Proceedings, New York City, May 9-12, 1837
Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism, with Reference to the Duty of American Females, 1837
Redefining the Rights of Women: The Grimke Sisters Speak in Massachusetts, Summer 1837
Letter to Jane Smith, Boston, May 29, 1837
"To Female Anti-Slavery Societies throughout New England," Boston, June 7, 1837
Letter to Jane Smith, Danvers, Mass., June 1837
Letter to Jane Smith, New Rowley, Mass., July 25, 1837
Letter to Amos Phelps, Groton, Mass., August 3, 1837
Pastoral Letter: The General Association of Massachusetts to Churches under Their Care, July 1837
Lecture by Albert Folsom, Pastor, Universalist Church, Hingham, Mass., August 27, 1837
Letter to Jane Smith, Groton, Mass., August 10, 1837
Letter to Theodore Weld, Groton, Mass., August 12, 1837
Letter to Sarah and Angelina Grimke, August 15, 1837
Letter to Angelina and Sarah Grimke, New York City, August 14, 1837
Letter to Theodore Dwight Weld and John Greenleaf Whittier, Brookline, Mass., August 20, 1837
Resolutions Adopted by the Providence, Rhode Island, Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society, October 21, 1837
Annual Report, 1837
"Human Rights Not Founded on Sex": Letter to Catharine Beecher, August 2, 1837
"Legal Disabilities of Women": Letter to Mary Parker, September 6, 1837
"Relation of Husband and Wife": Letter to Mary Parker, September 1837
The Antislavery Movement Splits Over the Women's Rights Question, 1837-1840
Speech at Pennsylvania Hall, Philadelphia, May 16, 1838
Letter to The Liberator, New York, May 15, 1840
Letter to Anne Warren Weston, Fort Lee, N.J., July 15, 1838
Letter to Angelina Grimke, Boston, September 2, 1839
Annual Meeting, October 1839
An Independent Women's Rights Movement Is Born, 1840-1858
On Meeting Lucretia Mott, London, June 1840
Letter to Sarah Grimke and Angelina Grimke Weld, London, June 25, 1840
Planning the Seneca Falls Convention, 1848
Report of the Woman's Rights Convention, Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19-20, 1848
Speech at Akron Women's Rights Convention, Ohio, June 1851
Address to the "Woman's Rights Convention," Worcester, Mass., October 1850
Proceedings of the Colored Convention, Cleveland, September 6, 1848
"Woman's Rights," October 1, 1849
"Just Treatment of Licentious Men," January 1838
Marriage and Parentage, 1858
Epilogue: The New Movement Splits Over the Question of Race, 1850-1869
The Saturday Visiter, November 2, 1850
Letter to Jane Swisshelm, November 18, 1850
"Woman's Rights and the Color Question," November 23, 1850
Speech at the Eleventh Woman's Rights Convention, New York, May 1866
Proceedings, New York City, May 1869
Founding of the National Woman Suffrage Association, New York, 1869
Appendices
Questions for Consideration
Selected Bibliography
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×