Writing for Multimedia and the Web Content Development for Bloggers and Professionals

ISBN-10: 0240808223
ISBN-13: 9780240808222
Edition: 3rd 2006 (Revised)
List price: $44.95 Buy it from $2.99
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Description: 'Writing for Multimedia and the Web' describes how to write informational programs and stories. Some of the most successful CD-ROMs and World Wide Web programs are analyzed and documented along with extensive script samples.

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Book details

List price: $44.95
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Publication date: 7/21/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 520
Size: 7.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 2.464
Language: English

'Writing for Multimedia and the Web' describes how to write informational programs and stories. Some of the most successful CD-ROMs and World Wide Web programs are analyzed and documented along with extensive script samples.

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Interactive Media and the Writer
Interactivity and the Writer
Chapter Overview
Write It All!
Defining Interactive Multimedia and the Interactive Writer
Interactivity Versus Control
Thinking Interactively
Linking
High-Level Design and Information Architecture
Interactive Devices
Conclusion
References
Writing for Many Media
Chapter Overview
The Skills of the Interactive Writer
Text
Audio
Video
Conclusion
References
High-Level Design, Management, and Technical Skills Useful to the Interactive Writer
Chapter Overview
High-Level Design, Content, and Project Management
Technical Skills
Conclusion
References
The Multimedia and Web Site Production Team
Chapter Overview
The Writer
The Content Strategist
The Instructional Designer
The Information Architect or Interactive Architect
The Interface Designer
The Game Designer
The Usability Expert
The Subject Matter Expert
The Business Strategist
The Art Director/Creative Director/Graphic Artist
The Animator
The Project Manager
The Video/Audio Director/Developer
The Photographer/Videographer
The Voice Talent and Actors
The Programmer/Coder
The Product Manager
Conclusion
References
Script and Proposal Formatting
Chapter Overview
Scripting Software
Preliminary Documents: Outlines, Proposals, and Design Documents
Storyboards, Scripts, and Final Documents
Conclusion
References
Key Points from Part I: Interactive Media and the Writer
Multimedia Defined (Chapter 1)
Thinking Interactively (Chapter 1)
Linking (Chapter 1)
High-Level Design and Information Architecture (Chapter 1)
Interactive Devices (Chapter 1)
Writing for Many Media (Chapter 2)
High-Level Design and Management Skills (Chapter 3)
Flowcharting and Other Organizational Tools (Chapter 3)
Writing as Part of the Production Team (Chapter 4)
Script Formatting (Chapter 5)
Writing Informational Multimedia and Web Sites
Defining and Achieving Goals for Informational Multimedia and Web Sites
Chapter Overview
Informational Multimedia and Web Sites Defined
Defining the Goal: Business Context, Data, and Users
Example of Defining the Goal
Techniques to Achieve Common Informational Goals
Multimedia Games as Teaching Tools
Conclusion
References
Informational Multimedia and Web Architecture
Chapter Overview
Linear Structure
Linear Structure with Scene or Section Branching
Hierarchical Branching
Single-Level Linking
Parallel Path or Multipath Architecture
Dynamically-Generated Database Driven Web Sites
Passive Versus Active Information Delivery: Getting Beyond Click-and-Read with Simulations, Worlds, and Role Playing
Benefits of Active Information Delivery: Learning to Learn
Conclusion
References
Introduction to the Informational Multimedia and Web Site Case Studies
Description of Case Studies
Case Study-Writing a Marketing Web Site from Proposal to Documentation: Prudential Verani Realty
Scope of This Chapter
Program Description and Background
Planning the Prudential Verani Realty Web Site
Writing the Web Site
After the Site Is Finished
Conclusion
References
Case Study-Corporate Web Site: T. Rowe Price
Program Description and Background
Meeting the Challenges of Writing and Developing the T. Rowe Price Web Site
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Case Study-Research Portal Web Site and the Online Feature Story: Britannica.com and the Harlem Renaissance
Program Description and Background
Challenges Writing and Developing the Harlem Renaissance
Meeting the Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Case Study-E-Learning: Interactive Math and Statistics Lessons
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges Writing the Interactive Math and Statistics Lessons
Writing the Interactive Math and Statistics Lessons: Meeting the Production Challenges
Writing the Interactive Math and Statistics Lessons: Meeting the Content Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Case Study-Museum Kiosk: The Nauticus Shipbuilding Company
Program Description and Background
Writing and Developing The Nauticus Shipbuilding Company
Meeting the Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Project
Reference
Case Study-Training: Vital Signs
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges Writing and Developing Vital Signs
Meeting the Challenges and Achieving the Goals
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Key Points from Part II: How to Write Nonnarrative Informational Multimedia
Gathering Information
Defining the Goal: Business Context, Data, and Users (Chapter 7)
Techniques to Achieve Common Informational Goals (Chapter 7)
Discovering an Approach
Writing the Program (Chapters 10 and 14)
Mechanics of Writing (Part I)
Writing Interactive Narrative
Interactive Multimedia Narrative and Linear Narrative
Chapter Overview
Narrative and Interactive Narrative Defined
Interactive Narratives Versus Simulations and Worlds
Computer Games and Video Games: Defining Terms
Interactive Multimedia Narratives
Classical Linear Narrative Elements Defined
Conclusion
References
The Elements of Interactive Multimedia Narrative
Chapter Overview
Linear Versus Interactive Narrative
Character and the Role of the Player
Architecture: Structure and Navigation
Exposition or Setup
Plot Points
Scenes
Pace and Time
Dialogue and Other Sound
Conclusion
References
Introduction to the Narrative Multimedia Case Studies
Description of Case Studies
Approach to Case Studies
How to Get Copies of the Games
Case Study-Adapting Classic Books to a Computer Game for the Female Audience: Nancy Drew: The Secret of the Old Clock
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges of Writing Nancy Drew: The Secret of the Old Clock
Meeting the Challenge of Adapting a 1930s Book to a 21st Century Computer Game: The Process of Writing The Secret of the Old Clock
Adapting a 1930s Novel to a Computer Game Conclusion
Meeting the Challenge of Developing a Computer Game for a Broad Female Audience
Meeting the Challenge of Completing All of the Tasks Described Above and Still Staying on Budget and Schedule
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Case Study-Adding Story to a Simulation: Amped 3
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges Writing Amped 3
Writing Amped 3: Meeting the Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Case Study-Parallel Stories Narrative: The Pandora Directive
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges Writing The Pandora Directive
Writing The Pandora Directive: Meeting the Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Case Study-Worlds Narrative: Dust: A Tale of the Wired West
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges Writing Dust: A Tale of the Wired West
Writing Dust: A Tale of the Wired West: Meeting the Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Program
References
Case Study-Immersive Exhibit: The New England Economic Adventure
Program Description and Background
Goals and Challenges Writing The New England Economic Adventure
Writing The New England Economic Adventure: Meeting the Challenges
Conclusion: Response to the Project
References
Key Points from Part III: How to Write Interactive Narrative
A Story with Interactive Potential
Strong Linear Narrative (Chapter 17)
Classical Structure (Chapter 17)
Characters
Architecture: Structure and Navigation (Chapter 18)
Storytelling Devices (Chapters 18, 23)
Mechanics of Scriptwriting (Part 1)
Interactive Writing Careers
Conclusion: Becoming a Professional Interactive Writer
Types of Jobs
The Challenges
Meeting the Challenges
Getting the Job
Good Luck
Writer and Designer Biographies and Company Descriptions
Glossary
Index

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