Betrayal How Black Intellectuals Have Abandoned the Ideals of the Civil Rights Era

ISBN-10: 0231139659

ISBN-13: 9780231139656

Edition: 2010

Authors: Houston A. Baker

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Description:

Houston A. Baker Jr. condemns those black intellectuals who, he believes, have turned their backs on the tradition of racial activism in America. These individuals choose personal gain over the interests of the black majority, whether they are espousing neoconservative positions that distort the contours of contemporary social and political dynamics or abandoning race as an important issue in the study of American literature and culture. Most important, they do a disservice to the legacy of W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King Jr., and others who have fought for black rights. In the literature, speeches, and academic and public behavior of some black intellectuals in the past quarter century, Baker identifies a "hungry generation" eager for power, respect, and money. Baker critiques his own impoverished childhood in the "Little Africa" section of Louisville, Kentucky, to understand the shaping of this new public figure. He also revisits classical sites of African American literary and historical criticism and critique. Baker devotes chapters to the writing and thought of such black academic superstars as Cornel West, Michael Eric Dyson, and Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Hoover Institution senior fellow Shelby Steele; Yale law professor Stephen Carter; and Manhattan Institute fellow John McWhorter. His provocative investigation into their disingenuous posturing exposes what Baker deems a tragic betrayal of King's legacy. Baker concludes with a discussion of American myth and the role of the U.S. prison-industrial complex in the "disappearing" of blacks. Baker claims King would have criticized these black intellectuals for not persistently raising their voices against a private prison system that incarcerates so many men and women of color. To remedy this situation, Baker urges black intellectuals to forge both sacred and secular connections with local communities and rededicate themselves to social responsibility. As he sees it, the mission of the black intellectual today is not to do great things but to do specific, racially based work that is in the interest of the black majority.
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Book details

List price: $25.00
Copyright year: 2010
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Publication date: 4/20/2010
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 272
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 0.792
Language: English

Houston Baker is one of the most persistent voices in African American literary criticism, one that has helped to establish a tradition in black literature from slave narratives and spirituals to blues and modern African American writing. He is a frequent contributor to literary journals, author and editor of numerous books, and a leading mover in the diversification of American literature.

Preface
Introduction: Little Africa
Jail: Southern Detention to Global Liberation
Friends Like These: Race and Neoconscrvatism
After Civil Rights: The Rise of Black Public Intellectuals
Have Mask, Will Travel: Centrists from the Ivy League
A Capital Fellow from Hoover: Shelby Steele
Reflections of a First Amendment Trickster: Stephen Carter
Man Without Connection: John McWhorter
American Myth: Illusions of Liberty and Justice for All
Prison: Colored Bodies, Private Profit
Conclusion: What Then Must We Do?
Notes
References
Index
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