Instruction A Models Approach

ISBN-10: 0205508863
ISBN-13: 9780205508860
Edition: 5th 2007 (Revised)
List price: $116.20
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Description: This text makes over one dozen instructional models clear and relevant for by placing them within a standards-based and instructionally aligned process. Based on current research and best practice, the models are closely linked to the preparation of  More...

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Book details

List price: $116.20
Edition: 5th
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Incorporated
Publication date: 9/20/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 400
Size: 7.25" wide x 8.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.496
Language: English

This text makes over one dozen instructional models clear and relevant for by placing them within a standards-based and instructionally aligned process. Based on current research and best practice, the models are closely linked to the preparation of objectives, differentiation practices, and assessment options. Current and future K-12 teachers

Tom Estesnbsp;holds the distinction of Professor Emeritus, University of Virginia. From 1970 to 2001, he served as professor of Reading Education in the Curry School of Education, University of Virginia. During his tenure at the University he was engaged in research related to how children learn to read, focusing on how they acquire the ability to read for the purpose of learning. He was principal investigator on an NIE/NSF research project on the relationship between text structure and comprehension. He is author ofReading and Learning in the Content Classroom, 2nd edition (1985) andReading and Reasoning Beyond the Primary Grades(1986), both published by Allyn & Bacon. nbsp; Susan L. Mintz , associate professor at the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, is the program coordinator of Secondary Education.nbsp; She received her Ph.D. in teacher education from Syracuse University.nbsp; Dr. Mintz teaches both pre-service teachers and curriculum and instruction graduate students.nbsp; She is a member of the Secondary CLASS observation team at the Universityrsquo;s Center for the Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning.

Planning for Instruction
Educational Goals and Standards
How Learning Happens
Special Student Characteristics
The Needs of Learners
Acceptance and Safety
Choice
High Expectations and Appropriate Challenge
Opportunity to Connect the New to the Known
Meaningful Engagement
Clarity
Time to Reflect
Evaluation That Tests What Was Taught
The Needs of Society
Learning Standards
Moving from Standards to Instruction
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Organizing Content
Content
School Curriculum
Analyzing Content
Ordering Content
Instructional Planning
Scope
Focus
Sequence
Chunking Instruction
Developing Lesson Plans
Lesson Plan Elements
Deductive and Inductive Organization
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Instructional Objectives, Assessment, and Instruction
Purpose of Instructional Objectives
Formats for Instructional Objectives
Students Will Know Instructional Objectives
Students Will Understand Instructional Objectives
Students Will Be Able to Instructional Objectives
Instructional Alignment
Assessing Instructional Objectives
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Summary for Part One
Matching Objectives to Instruction: A Models Approach
The Direct Instruction Model: Teaching Basic Skills, Facts, and Knowledge
Basis for the Direct Instruction Model
Big DI and the Direct Instruction Model
Steps in the Direct Instructional Model
Review Previously Learned Material
State Objectives for the Lesson
Present New Material
Guide Practice, Assess Performance, and Provide Corrective Feedback
Assign Independent Practice, Assess Performance, and Provide Corrective Feedback
Review Periodically, Offering Corrective Feedback If Necessary
Summary of Steps in the Direct Instruction Model
Matching Objectives and Assessments to Direct Instruction
Differentiation Possibilities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
The Concept Attainment Model: Defining Concepts Inductively
What Is a Concept?
Basis for the Concept Attainment Model
Steps in the Concept Attainment Model
Select and Define a Concept and Select the Attributes
Develop Positive and Negative Examples
Introduce the Process to the Students
Present the Examples and List the Attributes
Develop a Concept Definition
Give Additional Test Examples
Discuss the Process with the Class
Evaluate
Summary of Steps in the Concept Attainment Model
Variations on the Concept Attainment Model
Differentiation Possibilities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
The Concept Development Model: Analyzing the Relationships between Parts of a Concept
Understanding Concepts
What Is Concept Development?
Concept Development Mirrors Our Natural Thought Processes
Basis for the Concept Development Model
Conceptual Thinking Is Learned
Concepts Are Creative Ways of Structuring Reality
Concepts Are the Building Blocks of Patterns
Steps in the Concept Development Model
List as Many Items as Possible That Are Associated with the Subject
Group the Items Because They Are Alike in Some Way
Label the Groups by Defining the Reasons for Grouping
Regroup or Subsume Individual Items or Whole Groups under Other Groups
Synthesize the Information by Summarizing the Data and Forming Generalizations
Evaluate Students' Progress by Assessing Their Ability to Generate a Wide Variety of Items and to Group Those Items Flexibly
Summary of Steps in the Concept Development Model
Differentiation Opportunities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Benefits of Using the Concept Development Model
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Problem-Centered Inquiry Models: Teaching Problem Solving through Discovery and Questioning
Basis for the Inquiry Approach to Instruction
The Suchman Inquiry Model
Steps in the Suchman Inquiry Model
Select a Problem and Conduct Research
Introduce the Process and Present the Problem
Gather Data
Develop a Theory and Verify
Explain the Theory and State the Rules Associated with It
Analyze the Process
Evaluate
Summary of Steps in the Suchman Inquiry Model
The WebQuest Model of Inquiry
Steps in the WebQuest Model of Inquiry
The Teacher Selects a Problem and Conducts Preliminary Research
Present the Problem in the WebQuest Template
Students Gather Data and Information to Solve the Problem
Students Develop and Verify Their Solution
Problem-Based Learning
Steps in the Problem-Based Learning Model
Explore the Problem
Use the Inquiry Chart to Map Learning
Share Different Solutions
Take Action
Scenario
Differentiation Opportunities
Assessment Options
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
The Synectics Model: Developing Creative Thinking and Problem Solving
Basis for Synectics
Making the Familiar Strange
Steps in Synectics: Making the Familiar Strange
Describe the Topic
Create Direct Analogies
Describe Personal Analogies
Identify Compressed Conflicts
Create a New Direct Analogy
Reexamine the Original Topic
Evaluate
Summary of Steps in Making the Familiar Strange
Making the Strange Familiar
Steps in Synectics: Making the Strange Familiar
Provide Information
Present the Analogy
Use Personal Analogy to Create Compressed Conflicts
Compare the Compressed Conflict with the Subject
Identify Differences
Reexamine the Original Subject
Create New Direct Analogies
Evaluate
Summary of Steps in Making the Strange Familiar
The Synectics Excursion
Steps in the Synectics Excursion
Present the Problem
Provide Expert Information
Question Obvious Solutions and Purge
Generate Individual Problem Statements
Choose One Problem Statement for Focus
Question through the Use of Analogies
Force Analogies to Fit the Problem
Determine a Solution from a New Viewpoint
Evaluate
Summary of Steps in the Synectics Excursion
Differentiation Possibilities
Assessment Options
Scenario for Making the Familiar Strange
Describe the Topic
Create Direct Analogies
Describe Personal Analogies
Identify Compressed Conflicts
Create a New Direct Analogy
Reexamine the Original Topic
Evaluate
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
The Cause-and-Effect Model: Influencing Events by Analyzing Causality
Basis for the Cause-and-Effect Model
Steps in the Cause-and-Effect Model
Practice Sheet
The Steps in More Detail
Choose the Data or Topic, Action, or Problem to Be Analyzed
Ask for Causes and Support for Those Causes
Ask for Effects and Support
Ask for Prior Causes and Support
Ask for Subsequent Effects and Support
Ask for Conclusions
Ask for Generalizations
Evaluate Students' Performances
Summary of Steps in the Cause-and-Effect Model
Comments on Conducting the Model
Variations on the Cause-and-Effect Model
Differentiation Possibilities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
The Socratic Seminar Model: Analyzing Text
Basis for the Socratic Seminar Model
Questioning
Examples of Question Types
Revised Taxonomy Question Examples
Steps in the Socratic Seminar Model
Choose the Text-Written, Visual, or Audio
Plan and Cluster Several Questions of Varying Cognitive Demand
Introduce the Model to the Students
Conduct the Discussion
Review and Summarize the Discussion
Evaluate the Discussion with the Students Based on Previously Stated Criteria
Summary of Steps in the Socratic Seminar Model
Differentiation Opportunities
Assessment Options
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
The Vocabulary Acquisition Model: Learning the Spellings and Meanings of Words
Basis for the Vocabulary Acquisition Model
Steps in the Vocabulary Acquisition Model
Pretest Knowledge of Words Critical to Content
Elaborate on and Discuss Invented Spellings and Hypothesized Meanings
Explore Patterns of Meaning
Read and Study
Evaluate and Posttest
Summary of Steps in the Vocabulary Acquisition Model
Differentiation Possibilities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Summary
Essential Resources for Language Study
Web Resources
Notes
The Resolution-of-Conflict Model: Reaching Solutions through Shared Perspectives
Conflicts
Basis for the Resolution-of-Conflict Model
Steps in the Conflict-Resolution Model
The Steps in More Detail
List All the Facts Pertinent to the Conflict
Identify the Reasons for the Actions, the Feelings of the Participants, and the Reasons for Those Feelings
Propose Solutions and Review Their Possible Effects
Decide on the Best Resolution and Hypothesize What the Consequences Would Be
Discuss Similar Situations
Evaluate the Decision and Look for Alternative Solutions
Arrive at Generalizations
Evaluate
Summary of Steps in the Resolution-of-Conflict Model
Differentiation Opportunities
Assessment Options
High School Scenario
Elementary School Scenario
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Eggen and Kauchak's Integrative Model: Generalizing from Data
Basis for Eggen and Kauchak's Integrative Model
Steps in the Eggen and Kauchak Integrative Model
Planning for the Eggen and Kauchak Integrative Model
The Steps in More Detail
Describe, Compare, and Search for Patterns in a Data Set
Explain the Identified Similarities and Differences
Hypothesize What Would Happen under Different Conditions
Make Broad Generalizations about the Topic and the Discussion
An Elementary Integrative Example
Summary of Steps in the Eggen and Kauchak Integrative Model
Differentiation Opportunities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Cooperative Learning Models: Improving Student Learning Using Small Groups
Cooperative Learning Explained
Basis of Cooperative Learning Models
Cooperative Learning Model: The Template
Planning Steps
Implementation Steps
Summary of Cooperative Learning Template Model Steps
Specific Cooperative Models
The Graffiti Model
Prepare the Graffiti Questions and Group Number and Composition
Distribute Materials
Group Answers Questions
Exchange Questions
Return to the Original Question, Summarize, and Make Generalizations
Share Information
Evaluate the Group Process
Summary of Graffiti Model Steps
The Jigsaw Model
Introduce the Jigsaw
Assign Heterogeneously Grouped Students to Expert and Learning Groups and Review Behavior Norms
Explain the Task and Assemble Expert Groups
Allow Expert Groups to Process Information
Experts Teach in Their Learning Group
Hold Individuals Accountable
Evaluate the Jigsaw Process
Summary of Jigsaw Model Steps
Academic Controversy
Students Prepare Their Positions
Students Present and Advocate Their Positions
Open Discussion and Rebuttals
Reverse Positions
Synthesize and Integrate the Best Evidence into a Joint Position
Present the Group Synthesis
Group Processing of the Controversy and Participation of Members
Summary of Academic Controversy Steps
Differentiation Opportunities
Assessment Options
Scenario
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Supporting Strategies: Using Instructional Strategies with Instructional Models
Scaffolding
Information Recall Strategies
The Link Strategy
The Loci Strategy
Memory through Motion Strategy
Nonlinguistic Representations
Graphic Organizers
Physical Models
Mental Pictures
Drawing Pictures
Kinesthetic Activities
Think, Pair, Share Strategies
Identifying Similarities and Differences
Summarizing
Reciprocal Teaching
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Putting It All Together: Matching Objectives to Instructional Models
A Kindergarten Case Study
Miss Abbott's Plan
Unit: Lines That Draw Us Together
Opening Activity-Drawing in the Students
Practicing the "Line-Up"
Defining a Line
Refining the Concept of Line
Activity: The Line Game
Notes on Lessons One, Two, and Three
Epilogue
Summary
A Middle School Case Study
The Mumford Plan
Unit: Perspective-It All Depends on Where You "Were When
Toward a Perspective on Point of View
Perception-It Depends on Where You Are Coming From
Relating Perception and Perspective
Epilogue
Summary
Note
A High School Case Study
Mr. Samuels's Plan
Unit: Macbeth-A Study in Ambition Turned to Avarice
Sample Lesson Five: Ambition and the Power of Suggestion
Epilogue
Summary
Note
The Wisdom of Practice: Creating a Positive Learning Environment
Good Teachers Are in Charge of Their Classrooms
Good Teachers Create a Pleasant Physical Environment for Learning
Relationship to Student Learning
Furniture Arrangement/Seating
Climate Control
Equipment and Displays
Good Teachers Manage Human Relations Effectively
Good Teachers Engage Learners in the Process of Their Own Learning
Good Teachers Teach Up
They Recognize the Pygmalion Effect
They Capitalize on What Students Know
They Celebrate Differences among Students
They Realize That There is More Than One Right Answer to Important Questions
They Recognize Achievement and Minimize the Importance of Error
Good Teachers Are Good Learners
They Serve as a Model for Learning
They Recognize the Importance of Professional Knowledge
They Act as Researchers
Good Teachers Develop Instructional Objectives with Learners
They Vest Students with an Interest in Learning
They Provide Students with Quality Feedback
Good Teachers Find Out Why a Plan Is Not Working
Good Teachers Strive to Make Their Teaching Engaging
Good Teachers Give Learners Access to Information and Opportunity to Practice
Good Teachers Teach for Two Kinds of Knowledge
Summary
Web Resources
Notes
Summary for Part Three
Index

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