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Basic Vision An Introduction to Visual Perception

ISBN-10: 0199286701
ISBN-13: 9780199286706
Edition: 2006
List price: $79.95
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Description: How do we spot a familiar face from across a crowded room, and know that we're not waving to a complete stranger? How can we judge that the oncoming car is approaching too fast for us to cross the road safely, and we're better off waiting at the  More...

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Book details

List price: $79.95
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 7/13/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 408
Size: 7.75" wide x 9.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.518
Language: English

How do we spot a familiar face from across a crowded room, and know that we're not waving to a complete stranger? How can we judge that the oncoming car is approaching too fast for us to cross the road safely, and we're better off waiting at the kerb? Basic Vision: An Introduction to Visual Perception demystifies the processes through which the brain 'sees'. It leads us through the various elements that come together as our perception of the world around us: the perception of size, colour, motion, and three-dimensional space. It illustrates the intricacy of the visual system, discussing its development during infancy, and revealing how the brain can get it wrong, either as a result of brain damage, through which the network of processes become compromised, or through illusion, where the brain compensates for mixed messages by seeing what it thinks should be there, rather than conveying the reality. The book also demonstrates the importance of contemporary techniques and methodology, and neuroscience-based techniques in particular, in driving forward our understanding of the visual system. With a sense of enthusiasm for the subject that pervades the book, Basic Vision will motivate and engage even the most reluctant learner, opening up to an undergraduate audience this stimulating yet challenging subject for the first time. Online Resource Centre: For Lecturers: Figures from the book available to download, to facilitate lecture preparation Customizable course outlines and student handouts, to facilitate lecture delivery Test bank of multiple choice questions - a readily available tool for either formative or summative assessment For the student: Annotated web links, giving students ready access to these additional learning resources Update section, giving links to web sites and journal articles to illustrate to the student developments in the field since the book published

Peter Thompson, Ph.D., has been the Sydney Mayer Lecturer in Early American History at Oxford University since January 1993. He earned his doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania and spent four years as Lecturer in American History at Princeton University. He resides in England.

Figure acknowledgements
A trailer to the book
An apology
The problem
Vision in action
Illusions
Damage to the system
The brain
The study of vision
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
The first steps in seeing
The eye
The photoreceptors
The retinal ganglion cells
Beyond the eye - the optic nerve
The lateral geniculate nucleus
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
Signalling changes
Introduction
A problem
Retinal ganglion cells and receptive fields
Receptive fields and image processing
Some effects of retinal processing
Conclusion
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials and questions of interest
To the cortex
The primary visual cortex (aka V1, striate cortex, area 17)
Orientation selectivity
Organization of primary visual cortex
Simple cells
Complex cells
Hypercomplex cells
Trigger features
Face cells
The grandmother cell hypothesis
Beyond V1 - the extrastriate areas
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
Spatial vision
Experiments on humans
The tilt after-effect
A neural explanation of the tilt after-effect
Tilt-specific threshold elevation
The size after-effect
Simultaneous tilt and size illusions
Size-specific threshold elevation
Contrast sensitivity
Peripheral vision
Retinal versus real size
Some visual illusions explained?
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
Colour vision
Introduction
What is colour, and why would you want to see it?
The nature of light
A single-cone system - monochromatic vision
A two-cone system - dichromatic vision
A three-cone system - trichromatic vision
Comparing activity in cones - colour opponency
Colour-opponent cells
Two-colour vision systems
Colour blindness
Cortical processes in colour vision
Colour constancy
Back to the cortex
Cerebral achromatopsia
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
The perception of motion
Two ways of seeing movement
A motion detector
The motion after-effect
Speed
Apparent motion
Motion blindness and area MT (V5)
How do we tell what moves and what stays still?
Vection and stability
Vection and vomit
Conclusion
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
The third dimension
Introduction
Stereoscopic vision
The correspondence problem and random dot stereograms
Physiological mechanisms and disparity
Stereo-blindness
Motion parallax
Pictorial cues
Size constancy, depth perception, and illusions
Conclusions
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
The development of vision
Introduction
Measuring a baby's vision
Selective rearing experiments
Problems of vision
Putting things right
Active versus passive vision
Vision in old age
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
Attention and neglect
Introduction
Moving attention
Spot the difference - change blindness
Objects and space
Visual search
Feature integration theory
Guided search
Neglect
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
The perception of faces
The face as a special stimulus
Just how good are we at recognizing faces?
Feature configurations
Recognizing individuals
Physiology of face recognition
Prosopagnosia
Delusions
Conclusions
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
Vision and action
'What' and 'where' streams in vision
Blindsight
The superior colliculus route
Balint-Holmes syndrome or optic ataxia
Visual form agnosia
Dissociation of perception and action
Eye movements
Saccadic suppression
Eye movements in real tasks
Conclusion
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
How we know it might be so...
Anatomical techniques
Recording techniques
Microstimulation
Lesioning
Neuropsychology
Psychophysics
Readings and references
Possible essay titles, tutorials, and questions of interest
Index

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