Evolution

ISBN-10: 0199255636
ISBN-13: 9780199255634
Edition: 2nd 2005 (Revised)
List price: $117.95 Buy it from $26.13
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: The second edition of Evolution introduces the basic mechanisms of microevolution, natural selection, and macroevolutionary processes such as speciation and extinction. It also examines key events in evolution throughout the geological record and  More...

Used Starting from $67.79
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
You could win $10,000

Get an entry for every item you buy, rent, or sell.

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Writing a Scientific Report Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $117.95
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/27/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 596
Size: 7.75" wide x 10.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 2.112

The second edition of Evolution introduces the basic mechanisms of microevolution, natural selection, and macroevolutionary processes such as speciation and extinction. It also examines key events in evolution throughout the geological record and discusses coevolution and evolutionary medicine. In addition, the text discusses unsolved problems and looks ahead to future developments in this dynamic field. The text is organized into five parts. Part One introduces the basic mechanisms of microevolution: selection, inheritance, and development. Part Two considers how natural selection has designed organisms for reproductive success. Part Three explores macroevolutionary processes such as speciation and extinction. Part Four examines key events in evolution throughout the geological record. Part Five discusses coevolution and evolutionary medicine, which integrate and contrast micro- and macroevolution. The book closes with a chapter that recapsulates major issues, discusses unsolved problems, and looks ahead to future developments in this dynamic field. Evolution, Second Edition, is ideal for introductory undergraduate courses in evolutionary biology. A companion website contains downloadable images from the text, interactive simulations to help students explore the subject in a hands-on manner, and additional study questions with answers. Access it at http://www.oup.com/uk/booksites/content/0199255636/.

Preface
Acknowledgements
Brief Contents
Introduction
What evolution is about
Evolution yields striking insights
Ideas about evolution have a history
Creationists object to evolution for several reasons
Ignoring the reality of evolution would be dangerous
Summary
Recommended Reading
Microevolutionary concepts
Adaptive evolution
When is evolution adaptive, and when is it neutral?
The ordinary causes of selection have extraordinary adaptive consequences
Natural selection can rapidly produce improbable states
Adaptations increase reproductive success
Selection has been demonstrated in natural populations
When selection is strong evolution can be fast
The context of selection depends on the thing selected
Selection to benefit groups at the expense of individuals is unlikely but not impossible
Four factors can limit adaptation
Conclusion
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Neutral evolution
How do gene frequencies change when there is no selection?
Why variation in genes may not produce variation in fitness
Neutral genetic variation experiences random processes
Genetic drift: the gene-pool model
Genetic drift is significant in molecular evolution
Species dynamics resemble genetic dynamics
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
The genetic impact of selection on populations
Genetic change is a key to understanding evolution
Genetic systems are sexual or asexual, haploid or diploid
A brief comment on the role of models in science
Genetic change in populations under selection
What population genetics implies for evolutionary biology
The fitness concept in population genetics
Quantitative genetic change under selection
Evolutionary implications of quantitative genetics
Population and quantitative genetics are being integrated
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
The origin and maintenance of genetic variation
Without genetic variation, there can be no evolution
Mutations are the origin of genetic variation
Rates of mutation
How random are mutations?
The effect of recombination on genetic variability
The amount of genetic variation in natural populations
Evidence of natural selection from DNA sequence evolution
Genetic variation is maintained by a balance of forces
Genetic diversity of complex quantitative traits
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
The importance of development in evolution
The study of development answers important evolutionary questions
What happens during development from egg to adult?
Developmental patterns are associated with phylogeny
Developmental control genes are lineage-specific toolkits for constructing organisms
All evolutionary change involves changes in development
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
The expression of variation
The environmentally induced responses of one genotype produce several phenotypes
Reaction norms help us to analyze patterns of gene expression
The genotype-phenotype map has some important general features
Macro- and microevolution meet in the butterfly wing
Adaptive plasticity in leaf development is mediated by phytochromes
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Design by selection for reproductive success
The evolution of sex
To be sexual or asexual-that is the question
Variation in sexual life cycles
Distribution patterns of sexual reproduction
Sex has important consequences
The evolutionary maintenance of sex is a puzzle
Evidence on the function of sex is scarce but increasing
A pluralistic explanation of sex may be correct
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Genomic conflict
Multilevel selection occurs in a nested hierarchy of replicators
Genomic conflict may have been a driving force in many evolutionary transitions
Genomic conflict in sexual and asexual systems
The cytoplasm is a battleground for genomic conflicts
Genetic imprinting in mammals-a conflict over reproductive investment?
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Life histories and sex allocation
Natural selection is made possible by variation in life-history traits
To explain life-history evolution, we combine insights from five sources
The evolution of age and size at maturation
The evolution of clutch size and reproductive investment
Lifespans evolve, and so does aging
How should parents invest in male and female offspring or function?
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Sexual selection
Key questions about sexual selection
Sexual selection explains the existence of costly mating traits
How did sexual selection originate?
Organisms compete for mates in contests, scrambles, and endurance rivalries
Choosing mates can increase fitness, but choice has costs
There is a great deal of evidence for sexual selection
What determines the strength of sexual selection?
Sexual selection in plants involves pollen and pollination
Sexual selection also occurs in gametes
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Principles of macroevolution
Speciation
Speciation connects micro- to macroevolution
What is a species?
Species concepts can be reconciled with species criteria
Species originate as byproducts of intra-specific evolution
Reproduction isolation is a criterion of speciation
Experiments on speciation yield two important results
Speciation is the birth, extinction the death of a lineage
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Phylogeny and systematics
Molecular systematics has yielded surprising insights
How phylogenetic concepts are defined
How to build a phylogenetic tree
The names of groups should reflect relationships
Important issues in molecular systematics
The genealogy of genes can differ from the phylogeny of species
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Comparative methods: trees, maps, and traits
Putting trees on to maps reveals history
Plotting traits on to phylogenetic trees reveals their history
Anole lizards repeatedly evolved similar ecomorphs on different islands
Species are not independent samples
General comments on comparative methods
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
The history of life
Key events in evolution
The origin of life
The origin of the genetic code
The evolution of chromosomes
Eukaryotes differ from prokaryotes in key organizational features
The origin of multicellularity
The evolution of germ line and soma
Principles involved in key evolutionary events
The evolution of cooperation
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Major events in the geological theater
Organisms and landscapes are historical mosaics
How has the planet shaped life?
Mass extinctions repeatedly changed the course of evolution
Other catastrophes have had dramatic local effects
How has life shaped the planet?
Conclusion
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
The fossil record and life's history
The major eras
The major radiations
Groups expanding, vanishing, or gone
Vanished communities and extraordinary extinct creatures
Stasis may be selected
Punctuational change is real but not universal
Cope's Law-things get bigger-can be explained by either drift or selection
Evolution does not make progress; it simply continues to operate
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Integrating micro- and macroevolution
Coevolution
Scales of coevolution
Levels of coevolution
Principles of coevolution
Striking outcomes of coevolution-and its absence
Discussion
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Human evolution and evolutionary medicine
The evolution of humans
How our history has affected health and disease
How selection shapes virulence and atresia
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Conclusion and prospect
Key conclusions about evolution
Applying evolution to humans remains controversial
Evolutionary biology focused on genetics and will focus on development
How are traits fixed? How do constraints evolve?
Other unsolved problems
What are the limits to evolutionary prediction?
It is taking a long time to assimilate Darwin's insights
Summary
Recommended Reading
Questions
Genetic appendix
The blueprint of an organism is encoded in DNA molecules
Transmission of genetic material during cell division
DNA has a tendency to change by mutation
The genetic composition of a population
Glossary
Answers to questions
Literature cited
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×