Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking

ISBN-10: 0195445759
ISBN-13: 9780195445756
Edition: 5th 2012
List price: $93.95 Buy it from $49.97
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Description: Everyone thinks. But what does it mean to think critically? And what does it mean to create a good or a bad argument? In an age of fast technological and informational advances, living and working in the world is frequently and dramatically  More...

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Book details

List price: $93.95
Edition: 5th
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 10/17/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 480
Size: 7.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.65" tall
Weight: 1.716
Language: English

Everyone thinks. But what does it mean to think critically? And what does it mean to create a good or a bad argument? In an age of fast technological and informational advances, living and working in the world is frequently and dramatically changing. We are constantly bombarded with messagesconveyed via newspapers, television, and radio through to the social media that is now part of everyday life. The amount of information available to us is immense and growing rapidly. Designed to help students develop the quality of their thinking and to respond effectively to these often confusingand contradictory messages, Good Reasoning Matters! offers a guide to evaluating and constructing arguments. In addition to examining the most common features of faulty reasoning, the text introduces a variety of argument schemes and rhetorical techniques that will help students solve problems andconstruct sound arguments. Extensive exercises and examples taken from sources such as social media sites, newspapers, and topical news articles encourage students to consider a wide range of views and perspectives.With new features including a glossary, chapter summaries, and extensive revised exercises throughout, Good Reasoning Matters! is an essential text for courses in critical reasoning. The fifth edition of Good Reasoning Matters! offers:* a straightforward and valuable introduction to the principles of good reasoning;* many new examples of arguments drawn from a variety of classical and contemporary sources;* significant discussion of non-verbal - especially visual-arguments;* updated features including a glossary, chapter summaries, and links to exercises and quizzes online; and* a revamped companion website with additional resources for both instructors and students.

Leo Groarke is a professor of philosophy at Wilfrid Laurier University. His areas of interest are ethics, logic and the history of ideas, and he has published many articles on contemporary social issues in both scholarly journals and the popular press.

Christopher Tindale (Ph.D. & M.A., University of Waterloo; B.A., Wilfrid Laurier University) teaches and conducts research in the areas of argumentation theory, ethics, and ancient philosophy. Since 2000, he's been an editor of the journal Informal Logic: Reasoning and Argumentation in Theory and Practice, and he presently sits on the editorial board of Controversia. He is the author of Acts of Arguing: A Rhetorical Model of Argument (SUNY Press, 1999), co-author of Good Reasoning Matters, Third Edition (Oxford University Press, 2004), and co-editor of Argumentation and Its Applications (forthcoming CD-Rom) and two other CD-ROMs, Argumentation at the Century's Turn and Argumentation and Rhetoric . Recent work of his has appeared in the following journals: Argumentation; Informal Logic; ProtoSociology; Social Theory and Practice. In addition to teaching at Trent University, in 2001-2002 he was a research fellow at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research), Bielefeld, Germany.

Making Room for an Argument
Why make Room for an Argument
Defining Argument
Arguers and Systems of Belief
Audiences
Opponents and Proponents
Bias: Reading between the Lines
Bias
Detecting Illegitimate Biases
Difficult Cases
Arguments, Weak and Strong
Burden of Proof
Strong Arguments
Logical Consequence: Deductive and Inductive Validity
Contextual Relevance
Schemes and Counter-Schemes
Dressing Arguments
Simple and Extended Arguments
Inference Indicators: Distinguishing Arguments and Non-Arguments
Arguments without Indicator Words
Arguments and Explanations
Argument Narratives
Argument Diagrams
Argument Diagrams: Simple Arguments
Diagramming Extended Arguments
Linked and Convergent Premises
Supplemented Diagram
Diagramming Your Own Arguments
Hidden Argument Components
Speech Acts and the Princples of Communication
Hidden Conclusions
Hidden Premises
Non-Verbal Elements in Argument: Flags and Demonstrations
Symbols and Metaphors
A Note on Argument Construction
Definitions: Saying What You Mean
Using Words Precisely
Vagueness and Ambiguity
Formulating Definitions
Rules for Good Definitions
Expressing Your Intended Meaning
Weighing Evidence
Acceptable, Unacceptable, or Questionable?Conditions of Acceptability
Conditions of Unacceptability
Internal Relevance
Sufficiency
Applying the Criteria
Looking for the Facts
Generalizations
Polling
General Causal Reasoning
More Empirical Schemes and the Reasons of Science
Particular Causal Reasoning
Arguments from Ignorance
Scientific Reasoning
Schemes of Value
Slippery-Slope Arguments
Arguments from Analogy
Appeals to Precedent
Two-Wrongs Reasoning
Ethotic Schemes
Pro Homine
Ad Populum Arguments
Arguments from Authority
Ad Hominem
Arguments Against Authority
Appeal to Eyewitness Testimony
Guilt (and Honour) by Association
Other Cases
Essaying an Argument
The Good Evaluative Critique
The Good Argumentative Essay
A Student's Paper
Conclusion
Syllogisms: Classifying Arguments
Categorical Statements
Immediate Inferences
Categorical Syllogisms
Venn Diagrams
Propositional Logic ISimple and Complex Propositions
Disjunctions and Conditionals
Translation
Propositional Schemes and Proofs
Propositional Logic IIConditional Proofs
Reductio ad Absurdum
Dilemmas
De Morgan's Laws
Summary: Rules of Inference

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