Libertador Writings of Sim�n Bol�var

ISBN-10: 0195144813
ISBN-13: 9780195144819
Edition: 2003
List price: $24.95 Buy it from $4.38
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Description: General Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), called El Liberator, and sometimes the "George Washington" of Latin America, was the leading hero of the Latin American independence movement. His victories over Spain won independence for Bolivia, Panama,  More...

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Book details

List price: $24.95
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 5/15/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 288
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.682
Language: English

General Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), called El Liberator, and sometimes the "George Washington" of Latin America, was the leading hero of the Latin American independence movement. His victories over Spain won independence for Bolivia, Panama, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Bolivar became Columbia's first president in 1819. In 1822, he became dictator of Peru. Upper Peru became a separate state, which was named Bolivia in Bolivar's honor, in 1825. The constitution, which he drew up for Bolivia, is one of his most important political pronouncements. Today he is remembered throughout South America, and in Venezuela and Bolivia his birthday is a national holiday. Although Bolivar never prepared a systematic treatise, his essays, proclamations, and letters constitute some of the most eloquent writing not of the independence period alone, but of any period in Latin American history. His analysis of the region's fundamental problems, ideas on political organization and proposals for Latin American integration are relevant and widely read today, even among Latin Americans of all countries and of all political persuasions. The "Cartagena Letter," the "Jamaica Letter," and the "Angostura Address," are widely cited and reprinted.

Ana Dopico is Associate Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at New York University. Fred Fornoff is Professor of Humanities and Spanish, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and former President of The American Literary Translators Association.

Series Editors' General Introduction
Chronology of Simon Bolivar
An Overview of the Bolivarian Sources
Translator's Note
Introduction
The Major Political Statements
The Cartagena Manifesto: Memorial Addressed to the Citizens of New Granada by a Citizen from Caracas (15 December 1812)
The Jamaica Letter: Response from a South American to a Gentleman from This Island (6 September 1815)
The Angostura Address (15 February 1819)
The Bolivian Constitution (1826)
Address to the Constituent Congress (25 May 1826)
Draft of a Constitution for Bolivia
Message to the Convention of Ocana (29 February 1828)
A Glance at Spanish America (1829)
Address to the "Congreso Admirable": Message to the Constituent Congress of the Republic of Colombia (20 January 1830)
Lesser Bolivarian Texts
Political and Military
Oath Taken in Rome (15 August 1805)
Decree of War to the Death (15 June 1813)
Manifesto to the Nations of the World (20 September 1813)
Manifesto of Carupano (7 September 1814)
Manifesto on the Execution of General Manuel Piar (17 October 1817)
Declaration of Angostura (20 November 1818)
My Delirium on Chimborazo (1822)
Letter to Jose Antonio Paez: "Nor Am I Napoleon" (6 March 1826)
A Soldier's Death Penalty Commuted (26 January 1828)
Manifesto Justifying the Dictatorship (27 August 1828)
Manifesto Concerning the Installation of the Constituent Congress, the End of the Dictatorship, and Announcing the End of His Political Career (20 January 1830)
Letter to General Juan Jose Flores: "Ploughing the Sea" (9 November 1830)
Final Proclamation of the Liberator (10 December 1830)
International Affairs
Letter to Sir Richard Wellesley: An Appeal for Support (27 May 1815)
Letter to Baptis Irvine, Agent of the United States of America to Venezuela: Debating Neutral Rights (20 August 1818)
Invitation to the Governments of Colombia, Mexico, Rio de la Plata, Chile, and Guatemala to Hold a Congress in Panama (7 December 1824)
Letter to General Francisco de Paula Santander: The Brazilian Empire, Upper Peru, North Americans, and Other Problems (30 May 1825)
Thoughts on the Congress to Be Held in Panama (1826)
Letter to General Lafayette: On George Washington (20 March 1826)
Letter to Colonel Patrick Campbell, British Charge d'Affaires: "Plague America with Miseries" (5 August 1829)
Social and Economic Affairs
Decree for the Emancipation of the Slaves (2 June 1816)
Redistribution of Properties as Compensation for Officers and Soldiers (10 October 1817)
Letter to General Francisco de Paula Santander: On Slave Recruitment (18 April 1820)
Decrees on Indian Rights, Lands, and Tribute
Decree Abolishing Personal Service Imposed on the Native Peoples: New Statute Governing Their Work (20 May 1820)
Proclamation of the Civil Rights of Indians and Prohibition of Their Exploitation by Officials, Priests, Local Authorities, and Landowners (4 July 1825)
Resolution on the Redistribution of Communal Lands (4 July 1825)
Resolution That Colombian Indians Pay a Tax Called "a Personal Tribute from Indigenous Peoples" (15 October 1828)
Application of Capital Punishment to Officials Who Have Taken Money from Public Funds (12 January 1824)
Measures for the Protection and Wise Use of the Nation's Forest Resources: Bolivar As Ecologist (31 July 1829)
Education and Culture
Method to Be Employed in the Education of My Nephew Fernando Bolivar (1822?)
Decree on the Installation of Several Normal Schools Based on the Lancasterian System (31 January 1825)
Letters to Jose Joaquin de Olmedo: Critique of the "Victoria de Junin"
27 June 1825
12 July 1825
Circular on Educational Reform: Bentham Treatises Banned from All Colombian Universities (12 March 1828)
Prohibition of Secret Societies (8 November 1828)
Notes
Select Bibliography

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