Interpreting Epidemiologic Evidence Strategies for Study Design and Analysis

ISBN-10: 019510840X
ISBN-13: 9780195108408
Edition: 2003
Authors: David A. Savitz
List price: $67.00 Buy it from $10.42
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: Evaluating the strength or persuasiveness of epidemiologic evidence is inherently challenging, both for those new to the field and for experienced researchers. There is a myriad of potential biases to consider, but little guidance about how to  More...

New Starting from $69.60
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Medical Terminology Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
SQL Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $67.00
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 6/5/2003
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 336
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.75" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

Evaluating the strength or persuasiveness of epidemiologic evidence is inherently challenging, both for those new to the field and for experienced researchers. There is a myriad of potential biases to consider, but little guidance about how to assess the likely impact on study results. This book offers a strategy for assessing epidemiologic research findings, explicitly describing the goals and products of epidemiologic research in order to better evaluate its successes and limitations. The focus throughout is on practical tools for making optimal use of available data to assess whether hypothesised biases are operative and to anticipate concerns at the point of study design in order to ensure that needed information is generated. Specific tools for assessing the presence and impact of selection bias in both cohort and case-control studies, bias from non-response, confounding, exposure measurement error, disease measurement error, and random error are identified and evaluated. The potential value of each approach as well as its limitations are discussed, using examples from the published literature. Such information should help those who generate and interpret epidemiologic research to apply methodological principles more effectively to substantive issues, leading to a more accurate appraisal of the current evidence and greater clarity about research needs.

Introduction
The Nature of Epidemiologic Evidence
Goals of Epidemiologic Research
Measurement of Causal Relations Between Exposure and Disease
Inferences from Epidemiologic Research
Descriptive Goals and Causal Inference
Inferences from Epidemiologic Evidence: Efficacy of Breast Cancer Screening
Inferences from Epidemiologic Evidence: Alcohol and Spontaneous Abortion
Causal Inference
Contribution of Epidemiology to Policy Decisions
Strategy for Drawing Inferences from Epidemiologic Evidence
Need for Systematic Evaluation of Sources of Error
Need for Objective Assessment of Epidemiologic Evidence
Estimation of Measures of Effect
Conceptual Framework for the Evaluation of Error
Identify the Most Important Sources of Error
Strategies for Specifying Scenarios of Bias
Example: Epidemiologic Research on the Relation Between Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) Exposure and Breast Cancer
Selection Bias in Cohort Studies
Study Designs
Purpose of Comparison Groups
Selection Bias and Confounding
Evaluation of Selection Bias in Cohort Studies
Integrated Assessment of Potential for Selection Bias in Cohort Studies
Selection Bias in Case-Control Studies
Control Selection
Evaluation of Selection Bias in Case-Control Studies
Integrated Assessment of Potential for Selection Bias in Case-Control Studies
Bias Due to Loss of Study Participants
Conceptual Framework for Examining Bias Due to Loss of Study Participants
Evaluation of Bias Due to Loss of Study Participants
Integrated Assessment of Potential for Bias Due to Loss of Study Participants
Confounding
Definition and Theoretical Background
Quantification of Potential Confounding
Evaluation of Confounding
Integrated Assessment of Potential Confounding
Measurement and Classification of Exposure
Ideal Versus Operational Measures of Exposure
Evaluation of Exposure Misclassification
Assessment of Whether Exposure Misclassification is Differential or Nondifferential
Integrated Assessment of Potential for Bias Due to Exposure Misclassification
Measurement and Classification of Disease
Framework for Evaluating Disease Misclassification
Sources of Disease Misclassification
Differential and Nondifferential Disease Misclassification
Assessing Whether Misclassification Is Differential by Exposure
Evaluation of Disease Misclassification
Integrated Assessment of Potential for Bias Due to Disease Misclassification
Random Error
Sequential Approach to Considering Random and Systematic Error
Special Considerations in Evaluating Random Error in Observational Studies
Statistical Significance Testing
Multiple Comparisons and Related Issues
Interpretation of Confidence Intervals
Integrated Assessment of Random Error
Integration of Evidence Across Studies
Consideration of Random Error and Bias
Data Pooling and Coordinated Comparative Analysis
Synthetic and Exploratory Meta-Analysis
Interpreting Consistency and Inconsistency
Integrated Assessment from Combining Evidence Across Studies
Characterization of Conclusions
Applications of Epidemiology
Identification of Key Concerns
Integrated Consideration of Potential Bias
Integration of Epidemiologic Evidence with Other Information
Controversy over Interpretation
The Case Against Algorithms for Interpreting Epidemiologic Evidence
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×