Martin Chuzzlewit

ISBN-10: 0140436146

ISBN-13: 9780140436143

Edition: 1999

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Description:

This is the story of an inheritance, relating the destinies of two descendants of the brothers Chuzzlewit. Martin is a selfish young man, who lost his fortune in America. Jonas is a villain, committing murder, and eventually poisons himself.
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Book details

List price: $14.00
Copyright year: 1999
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 8/1/2000
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 864
Size: 4.75" wide x 7.50" long x 1.50" tall
Weight: 1.188
Language: English

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

Patricia Ingham is Fellow and Senior Tutor in English at St. Anne's College, Oxford, and Times Lecturer in English Language.

Introduction
Note on the Text
Preface
ntroductory, Concerning the Pedigree of The Chuzzlewit Family
Wherein Certain Persons Are Presented to The Reader, with Whom He May, If He Please, Become Better Acquainted
In Which Certain Other Persons Are Introduced; On The Same Terms as in the Last Chapter
In Which Certain Other Persons Are Introduced; On The Same Terms as in the Last Chapter
Accompanies Mr. Pecksniff and His Charming Daughters to the City of London; and Relates What Fell Out, Upon Their Way Thither
Town and Todgers's
Containing Strange Matter; on Which Many Events In This History, May, for Their Good or Evil Influence, Chiefly Depend
Wherein a Certain Gentleman Becomes Particular In His Attentions to a Certain Lady; and More Coming Events Than One, Cast Their Shadows Before
Will Be Seen in the Long Run, If Not in the Short One, To Concern Mr. Pinch and Others, Nearly. Mr. Pecksniff Asserts the Dignity of Outraged Virtue; And Young Martin Chuzzlewit Forms a Desperate Resolution
Showing, What Became of Martin and His Desperate Resolve, After He Left Mr. Pecksniff's House; What Persons He Encountered; What Anxieties He Suffered And What News He Heard
In Which Martin Bids Adieu to the Lady of His Love And Honors an Obscure Individual Whose Fortune He Intends to Make, by Commending Her to His Protection
In Which Martin Bids Adieu to the Lady of His Love And Honors an Obscure Individual Whose Fortune He Intends to Make, by Commending Her to His Protection
In Which Martin Bids Adieu to the Lady of His Love And Honors an Obscure Individual Whose Fortune He Intends to Make, by Commending Her to His Protection
Does Business with the House of Anthony Chuzzlewit And Son, from Which One of the Partners Retires Unexpectedly
The Reader is Brought into Communication With Some Professional Persons, and Sheds a Tear Over The Filial Piety of Good Mr. Jonas
The Reader is Brought into Communication With Some Professional Persons, and Sheds a Tear Over The Filial Piety of Good Mr. Jonas
More American Experiences. Martin Takes a Partner And Makes a Purchase. Some Account of Eden, as It Appeared on Paper. Also of the British Lion. Also Of The Kind of Sympathy Professed and Entertained, By The Watertoast Association of United Sympathizers
From Which It Will Be Seen That Martin Became a Lion On His Own Account. Together with the Reason Why
From Which It Will Be Seen That Martin Became a Lion On His Own Account. Together with the Reason Why
From Which It Will Be Seen That Martin Became a Lion On His Own Account. Together with the Reason Why
Is in Part Professional; and Furnishes the Reader With Some Valuable Hints in Relation to The Management of a Sick Chamber
An Unexpected Meeting, and a Promising Prospect
Showing That Old Friends May Not Only Appear With New Faces, but in False Colours. That People Are Prone to Bite; and That Biters May Sometimes Be Bitten
Showing That Old Friends May Not Only Appear With New Faces, but in False Colours. That People Are Prone to Bite; and That Biters May Sometimes Be Bitten
Showing That Old Friends May Not Only Appear With New Faces, but in False Colours. That People Are Prone to Bite; and That Biters May Sometimes Be Bitten
In Which the Travellers Move Homeward, And Encounter Some Distinguished Characters Upon the Way
Arriving in England, Martin Witnesses a Ceremony From Which He Derives the Cheering Information That He Has Not Been Forgotten in His Absence
Arriving in England, Martin Witnesses a Ceremony From Which He Derives the Cheering Information That He Has Not Been Forgotten in His Absence
Tom Pinch, Going Astray, Finds That He is Not The Only Person in That Predicament. He Retaliates Upon a Fallen Foe
Secret Service
Secret Service
The Pinches Make a New Acquaintance, and Have Fresh Occasion for Surprise and Wonder
Mr. Jonas and His Friend, Arriving at a Pleasant Understanding, Set Forth Upon an Enterprise
Continuation of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas And His Friend
Has an Influence on the Fortunes of Several People Mr. Pecksniff is Exhibited in the Plenitude of Power And Wields the Same with Fortitude and Magnanimity
Further Continuation of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas And His Friend
n Which Tom Pinch and His Sister Take a Little Pleasure; but Quite in a Domestic Way, and with No Ceremony About It
In Which Miss Pecksniff Makes Love, Mr. Jonas Makes Wrath, Mrs. Gamp Makes Tea, and Mr. Chuffey Makes Business
Conclusion of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas And His Friend
Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as Well As Of a Third Person Not Quite Unknown to the Reader Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and Casts ADoubtful Ray of Light Upon a Very Dark Place
Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as Well As Of a Third Person Not Quite Unknown to the Reader Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and Casts ADoubtful Ray of Light Upon a Very Dark Place
Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as Well As Of a Third Person Not Quite Unknown to the Reader Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and Casts ADoubtful Ray of Light Upon a Very Dark Place
Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as Well As Of a Third Person Not Quite Unknown to the Reader Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and Casts ADoubtful Ray of Light Upon a Very Dark Place
Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as Well As Of a Third Person Not Quite Unknown to the Reader Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and Casts ADoubtful Ray of Light Upon a Very Dark Place
Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as Well As Of a Third Person Not Quite Unknown to the Reader Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and Casts A Doubtful Ray of Light Upon a Very Dark Place
What John Westlock Said to Tom Pinch's Sister What Tom Pinch's Sister Said to John Westlock What Tom Pinch Said to Both of Them; and How They All Passed the Remainder of the Day
Gives the Author Great Concern. for It is the Last In the Book
Preface to the Cheap Edition (1850)
Preface to the Charles Dickens Edition (1867)
Postscript Added in 18681
Preliminaries and Number Plans
Explanatory Notes
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