Writing for the Visual Arts

ISBN-10: 0130225487
ISBN-13: 9780130225481
Edition: 2001
List price: $65.40 Buy it from $3.00
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Description: For any level course that deals with visual arts (art studio, painting sculpting, collage, drawing, graphic arts, or history, architecture, communications, film and theater.) Written in a reader-friendly style interlaced with vivid examples, this  More...

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Book details

List price: $65.40
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Publication date: 9/21/2000
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 160
Size: 5.50" wide x 7.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.330
Language: English

For any level course that deals with visual arts (art studio, painting sculpting, collage, drawing, graphic arts, or history, architecture, communications, film and theater.) Written in a reader-friendly style interlaced with vivid examples, this text details a comprehensive and concise methodology for the writing that students in the visual arts and those entering the professional world encounteracademic papers, resumes, letters of application, manifestos, press releases, and grants. Emphasizes that students' (or professionals') art, in itself, will not always speak for them, and that both students and professionals must, therefore, learn to articulate their concepts and ideas, and to argue for, and earn, their place in the world of art.

Preface
How to Write Academic Art Papers: Welcome to the Community
Introduction
Who Are You Writing To?
Your Teacher's Needs
Your Teacher's Attitudes
Your Teacher's Knowledge
One Last Audience Issue: The Chinese Box Notion of Discourse Communities
Inventing
Inventing as Assignment Analysis: Entering the Discourse Community Means Answering the Questions Asked
Inventing as Seeing the Art
Inventing as Developing a Working Thesis
Planning
Composing
Description--The Basic Building Block of Composing
Re-Visioning
Editing
Sources and Citations: Entering the Discussion with the Art Academic Community
Types of Research--Primary and Secondary
Tips for Using the World Wide Web for Research
Quoting and Paraphrasing Sources
Paraphrase, Don't Plagiarize
Citation Formats
How to Write About Your Art
Introduction
Vague Language
Considering Your Audience as a Way to Write Precisely
Writing Cleanly, Clearly, Personally
How to Revise and Peer Review: "Stitching and Restitching"
Introduction
Myth: Writing Is Inspiration, Not Work
What Is Revision?
Attitude Toward Revision
Me, Myself, and I?
Using Peer Response
The Role of the Critic, or How to be a Good Peer Reviewer
"Big Picture,"
Written Response
Verbal Responses
Responding to the Peer Reviews
Revision after Peer Review
Editing
How to Write a Resume: A Lifetime in 30 Seconds
Introduction
What Is a Resume?
Who Will Be Reading this Document?
Basic Rules of the Resume
Substance Over Style
Clarity and Familiarity
Getting Started
Gathering Materials
What to Include
Format
Prioritize
Contact Information
Objective
Chronological or Functional Resume?
Skills
Exhibitions, Education, Experience
Dates
Exhibitions and Related Headings
Awards and Honors
Commissions
Bibliography
Education
Work Experience
Additional Information
Languages
Hobbies
Last Line: "References Available Upon Request
Style and Presentation
Typography
Editing
Layout
Some Other Design Areas to Consider
Proofread
Update
How to Write a Letter of Application
Introduction
What Is a Letter of Application 85? Who Will Be Reading this Document?
Getting Started
Finding a Job
What to Include
Using the Resume
Some Basic Rules
Presentation
Names, Dates, and Addresses
Greetings
Opening Sentence
Development
Show, Don't Tell
Final Paragraph
Tone
Accentuate the Positive
Tweaking
Language
Revision
Editing
Font, Point Size, and Margins
Proofread
Making a Template
Some Common Grammar and Usage Errors
Writing Art Manifestos: Expressing Your Philosophy
Introduction
How Are Manifestos Used?
Developing the Content of Your Manifesto
Invention Ideas for Manifestos
Structuring Your Manifesto
Drafting Your Manifesto
Using Figurative Writing to Make Your Manifesto "Graspable,"
Emotion Alert? Avoid Making the Strings Swell
Revising the Manifesto
Shipping the Manifesto Off
How to Write Press Releases: An Invitation to Your Art
Introduction
What Is a Press Release?
Who Will Be Reading this Document?
Three General Rules of the Press Release
Describe, Describe, Describe
Remember, People Find People Interesting
Imitate News and Be Objective
Getting Started
Gathering Materials
Art Is News that Stays News
Format
Contact Information
White Space
Headlines
Matching the Publication and Your Headline
Headline Tone
The Body: Not a Whodunit
Length
Style
Shipping It Off
How to Write Grants and Proposals
Introduction
What Is a Grant?
Who Will Be Reading this Proposal?
Where to Look
Background
Eligibility
Projected Results
"Blind" Entries
Requirements
Description of the Project
Budget Planning
References
Before You Submit
Deadlines: Get Your Material in on Time
How Awards May Be Granted
Use the Money Up in Time
Final Words

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