Evidence-Based Educational Methods

ISBN-10: 0125060416
ISBN-13: 9780125060417
Edition: 2004
List price: $101.00 Buy it from $95.01
eBook available
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: Evidence-Based Educational Methods answers the challenge of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 by promoting evidence-based educational methods designed to improve student learning. Behavioral scientists have been refining these instructional  More...

New Starting from $102.60
eBooks Starting from $95.95
Buy
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
SQL Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
MS Excel® 2010 Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $101.00
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: Elsevier Science & Technology Books
Publication date: 5/7/2004
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 408
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.826
Language: English

Evidence-Based Educational Methods answers the challenge of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 by promoting evidence-based educational methods designed to improve student learning. Behavioral scientists have been refining these instructional methods for decades before the current call for evidence-based education. Precision Teaching, Direct Instruction, Computerized Teaching, Personalized System of Instruction, and other unique applications of behavior analysis are all informed by the scientific principles of learning, have been tested in the laboratory, and are often shown to have significant success in field applications. This book details each of these approaches to education based on the principles of behavior analysis. Individuals and agencies responsible for instruction that leaves no child behind will find this compendium an important resource for meeting that challenge, and young educators will greatly benefit from this text, as they will see a blueprint of the evidence-based education systems being planned for the future. * The education literature is replete with fly-by-night ideas and unresearched opinions about how to teach children. This book has none of that. The reader is given researched educational methods. In fact, some methods draw on 3 or 4 decades of experimental data. The whole book is cohesive, not just a patchwork of different educators' opinions. All of the chapters are built on basic scientific principles of behavior, and all of the methods can be used with one another * This is a book by scientist-practitioners, but not for scientists only. A parent can read many of these chapters, see the merit in the methods, and convey the need and the process for each of the methods * No book stands alone, but is connected to a greater literature base. The reader is shown where other information can be found about these methods. * The only thing better than scientific data is scientific data supported by consumer testimonial

Dan Vallero is an internationally recognized expert in the transport, chemical transformation and environmental fate of hazardous pollutants. His three decades of professional experience in hazardous waste engineering and management have included research, teaching and regulatory advice related to a wide range of human health risk and ecological issues, from global climate change to the release of hazardous products of incomplete combustion from waste incinerators to the assessment of the risks from exposures to environmental endocrine disruptors. Dr. Vallero recently established the Engineering Ethics program at Duke University. This innovative program introduces students to the complex relationships between science, technology and societal demands on the engineer. The lessons learned from the cases in this book are a fundamental part of Duke's preparation of its future engineers to address the ethical dilemmas likely to be encountered during the careers of the next generation engineers.

Contributors
Preface
Introduction to Evidence-Based Educational Methods
The Need for Evidence-Based Educational Methods
Introduction
No Child Left Behind
Behavior Analysis and Education
Reviewing the Outcomes and Principles of Effective Instruction
Introduction
Precision Teaching
Direct Instruction
Programmed Instruction
Personalized System of Instruction
Emphasis on the Written Word
Self Pacing
Mastery
Proctors
Lectures for Motivation or Reinforcement
Summary and Conclusion
A Real Science and Technology of Education
Introduction
The Need for a Strategic Science of Instruction
Components of an Advanced and Sophisticated Science and Technology of Instruction
Cabas: A Systems Technology of Schooling and a Strategic Science of Pedagogy
Conclusion
Precision Teaching
Precision Teaching: Foundations and Classroom Applications
Why Precision Teaching?
The Chart
Example of Precision Teaching Implementation
Read a Chart
Chart Features
Prediction
Relative Emphasis
Wide-Range Display
Another Chart Example: Middle School
Learning/Celeration
Precision Teaching's Place in Teaching and Education
Ethics and Precision Teaching Measures in Schools
Precision Teaching: Applications in Education and Beyond
Introduction
Precision Teaching and Special Education
Precision Teaching for Adult Learners in College and Pre-Vocational Training
Precision Teaching Applications for Individuals with Various Disabilities
Precision Teaching with Thoughts, Urges, and Other "Inner" Phenomena
Precision Teaching, Computers, and Internet Resources
Conclusions
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction: The Big Ideas
Introduction
Teaching Generalizable Strategies
Instructional Programs that Powerfully and Systematically Build Skills
Clear and Explicit Instruction
Sequence of Instruction
Provide Initial Support, Then Gradually Reduce Support
Provide Sufficient Practice and Mastery Critiera
Provide Clear Instructions to Teachers
Tracks
Organize Instruction to Maximize High-Quality Instructional Interactions
Placement
Flexible, Skill-Based Grouping for Efficient Instruction
High Rates of Overt and Active Engagement
Provide Effective Corrections
Research Related to Direct Instruction
Teacher-Made Scripted Lessons
Introduction
Definition of Explicit Instruction
Scripted Lessons
Orient and Review
Presentation of New Content
Practice
Model
Probes and Checks
Formal Assessments
Independent Practice
Exams
Distributed Practice
Positive Outcomes of Scripted Lessons
The Competent Learner Model: A Merging of Applied Behavior Analysis, Direct Instruction, and Precision Teaching
Introduction
Applied Behavior Analysis and The Competent Learner Model
What repertoires need to be developed or weakened?
What stimuli are available to affect change in behavior?
What contingencies are required to develop or weaken the repertoires?
How can the parts of instructional conditions be arranged and rearranged to develop the competent learner repertoires?
Direct Instruction and the Competent Learner Model
Precision Teaching and the Competent Learner Model
The Components of the Competent Learner Model
The CLM Course of Study
Coaching
Collaborative Consultation
Evidence of the Impact of the Competent Learner Model
Computers and Teaching Machines
Effective Use of Computers in Instruction
Introduction
What are the Types of Instructional Software?
Tutorial
Drill-and-Practice
Simulations
What are the Features of EffectiveInstructional Software?
Antecedents for Desired Behavior
Behavior: Active and Frequent Student Responding
Consequences: Feedback for Student Responses
What Makes Software Design Effective?
Navigational Aids
Presentation Style and Organization Structure
Distinctiveness of Information
Text Characteristics
What is the Evidence for the Effectiveness of Automated Instruction?
Meta-Analytic General Results
Specific Meta-Analytic Findings
How Should Particular Instructional Software be Evaluated?
Content
Outcomes
Generalization
Conclusions
Adaptive Computerized Educational Systems: A Case Study
Undergraduate Teaching in the Modern University
Undergraduate Teaching in Small Liberal Arts Colleges
Computers and Adaptive Instruction
Adaptive Control, Teaching, and Learning
Adaptive Instruction
Adaptive Testing
Mediamatrix and its Current Use in Higher Education
Fully Supported Shaping of Reading Comprehension Skills
Successive Approximations to Less Prompted Learning
Further Development of Verbal Associate Networks
Full Development of Verbal Associate Networks
How the Probe Mode Works
More on Adaptive Programmed Instruction: Parametrics of How Mediamatrix Works
Assess and Certification Modes
Instructor Options for Managing Student Contact with the Tutoring System
Empirical Research on Mediamatrix Delivered Adaptive Instruction
Higher Education's Four Horsemen of its Apocalypse
Conclusion
Selected for Success: How Headsprout Reading Basics Teaches Beginning Reading
Introduction
Key Skills and Strategies Students and Teachers' Best Friends
Learning Methodologies: Foundational and Flexible
Embracing the Burden of Proof: Headsprout's Unparalleled Learner Testing
Enabling Evolution: Headsprout's Recombinant Teaching and Engineering Models
Headsprout's Internet Advantage: Broad Availability and Continuous Improvement
Headsprout Reading basics: Empirical Data
Instructional Adaptability
Learner Performance Data
Reading Outcomes
Demonstrated Effective
Educator Feedback
Conclusion
Personalized System of Instruction
The Personalized System of Instruction: A Flexible and Effective Approach to Mastery Learning
Introduction
History and Overview
Key Features of PSI
The Rise of PSI
The Fall of PSI
Effectiveness
Flexibility
Implementing PSI in the 21st Century
Deciding To Use PSI
Key Features of PSI: Updated and Revised
Conclusion
Making the Most of PSI with Computer Technology
Introduction
Computers in Higher Education
A Brief History of CAPSI
How CAPSI Utilizes Computer Capabilities
Information-Processing Capabilities
Data Storage Capabilities
Communications Capabilities
Refinements of CAPSI
Higher-Order Thinking
Incentives for Student Behavior
Plagiarism
Preventing Mastery-Criterion Circumvention
Training
Programming CAPSI
The Peer Review System at Work
Comparison with Traditional Courses
Comparison with Other Computer-Mediated Courses
Expanding on Technology
Research Studies on CAPSI
Significant Developments in Evidence-Based Education
The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction: An Integration of Research-Based Practices
About Morningside Academy
Current Work
Morningside Teachers' Academy
External Partnerships
Summer School Institute(SSI)
Morningside Technology Transfer
Philosophical and Empirical Underpinnings
Generativity and Contingency Adduction
A System of Instruction
Establishing Objectives and Analyzing Content
Content-Dependent Analysis
Content-Independent Analysis
Instructional Program Development
Critical Thinking and Self-Regulation
Self-Direction and Independence
Program Placement and Monitoring Based on Continuous Measurement of Performance
Classroom Management
Empirical Data Supporting Technology Transfer of the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction
Conclusion
Learning Efficiency Goes to College
Introduction
What is Learning Efficiency?
Three Possible Causes of Poor Learning Efficiencies and Their Solutions
Case Study: Evaluating Learning Efficiencies in a CPSY 101 Course
What the Data Can Tell us about How to Improve Learning Efficiencies
Learning Efficiency Goes to College
Teaching the Generic Skills of Language and Cognition: Contributions from Relational Frame Theory
Introduction
Relational Frame Theory
Defining Derived Relational Responding
Relational Framing
Research in Relational Frame Theory and its Implications for Education
Derived Transformations of Function in Accordance with Symmetry
Teaching Derived Manding
Establishing the Relational Frames of More-Than, Less-Than, and Opposite
Relational Responding and Perspective Taking
Summary and Conclusions
Key Instructional Components of Effective Peer Tutoring for Tutors, Tutees, and Peer Observers
Introduction
Responding, Engagement, and an Effective Teacher Measure
New Experimental Analyses of Components of Effective Tutoring: Brief Reports of Five Studies
(Experiments 1 and 2)
General Discussion
Training Professionals Using Sequential Behavior Analysis
History and Introduction
Technology
A Sequential Analysis Illustration
Providing a Database
Scientific Methods
Participants and Setting
Dependent Measures
Observation Protocol
Inter-Observer Agreement
Experimental Design
General Instructional Feedback Strategy Procedures
Treatment Implementation Training
Treatment Integrity
Study Results
IO and AIA Data
OO and AOA Data
Discrete Pupil Data
Social Validation Data
Implications for Education and Professional Training
A Future for Sequential Behavior Analysis
Grammar and Writing Skills: Applying Behavior Analysis
Neglected Writing Skills
Methods of Teaching Writing
Writing as a Performance
The Behavioral Paradigm
Behavioral Strategies
Shaping
Measurement
Short-Term Feedback
Long-Term Feedback
Discrimination Training
Competition Analysis
The Process of Writing
A Last Word
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×