Thurber Carnival

ISBN-10: 0060932872
ISBN-13: 9780060932879
Edition: N/A
Authors: James Thurber
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Book details

List price: $15.99
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 11/19/2013
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 448
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

Born in Columbus, Ohio, Thurber was blinded in one eye in a childhood accident. He attended Ohio State University but left without earning a degree. In 1925 he moved to New York City, where he joined the staff of the New Yorker in 1927 at the urging of his friend E. B. White. For the rest of his lifetime, Thurber contributed to the magazine his highly individual pieces and those strange, wry, and disturbing pen-and-ink drawings of "huge, resigned dogs, the determined and sometimes frightening women, the globular men who try so hard to think so unsuccessfully." The period from 1925, when the New Yorker was founded, until the death of its creator-editor, Harold Ross, in 1951, was described by Thurber in delicious and absorbing detail in The Years with Ross (1959). Of his two great talents, Thurber preferred to think of himself primarily as a writer, illustrating his own books. He published "fables" in the style of Aesop (see Vol. 2) and La Fontaine (see Vol. 2)---usually with a "barbed tip of contemporary significance"---children's books, several plays (two Broadway hits, one successful musical revue), and endless satires and parodies in short stories or full-length works. "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," included in My World---and Welcome to It (1942), is probably his best-known story and continues to be frequently anthologized. T. S. Eliot described Thurber's work as "a form of humor which is also a way of saying something serious."

Foreword
Preface: My Fifty Years with James Thurber
Stories Not Collected Before in Book Form
The Lady on 142
The Catbird Seat
Memoirs of a Drudge
The Cane in the Corridor
The Secret Life of James Thurber
Recollections of the Gas Buggy
from My World and Welcome to It
What Do You Mean it Was Brillig?
The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
Here Lies Miss Groby
The Man Who Hated Moonbaum
The Macbeth Murder Mystery
A Ride with Olympy
from Let Your Mind Alone!
Destructive Forces in Life
Sex Ex Machina
The Breaking up of the Winships
The Admiral on the Wheel
A Couple of Hamburgers
Bateman Comes Home
Doc Marlowe
The Wood Duck
from The Middle-Aged Man on the Flying Trapeze
The Departure of Emma Inch
There's an Owl in my Room
The Topaz Cufflinks Mystery
Snapshot of a Dog
Something to Say
The Curb in the Sky
The Black Magic of Barney Haller
If Grant had been Drinking at Appomattox
The Remarkable Case of Mr. Bruhl
The Luck of Jad Peters
The Greatest Man in the World
The Evening's at Seven
One is a Wanderer
My Life and Hard Times, complete
Preface to a Life
The Night the Bed Fell
The Car We had to Push
The Day the Dam Broke
The Night the Ghost Got in
More Alarms at Night
A Sequence of Servants
The Dog that Bit People
University Days
Draft Board Nights
A Note at the End
from Fables for Our Time and Famous Poems Illustrated
The Birds and the Foxes
The Little Girl and the Wolf
The Scotty Who Knew too much
The Very Proper Gander
The Bear Who Let it alone
The Shrike and the Chipmunks
The Seal Who Became Famous
The Crow and the Oriole
The Moth and the Star
The Glass in the Field
The Rabbits Who Caused all the Trouble
The Owl Who was God
The Unicorn in the Carden
Excelsior
"Oh When I was ..."
Barbara Frietchie
The Sands O'Dee
Curfew Must Not Ring Tonight
from The Owl in the Attic
The Pet Department
from The Seal in the Bedroom
"With You I have Known Peace, Lida, and Now You Say You're Going Crazy"
"Are You the Young Man That Bit My Daughter?"
"Here's a Study for You, Doctor--He Faints"
"Mamma Always Gets Sore and Spoils the Game for Everybody"
"For the Last Time--You and Your Horsie Get Away from Me and Stay Away!"
"Well, What's Come Over You Suddenly?"
"Have You People Got Any .38 Cartridges?"
"The Father Belonged to Some People Who Were Driving Through in a Packard"
"Stop Me!"
"I Don't Know. George Got It Somewhere"
"All Right, Have It Your Way--You Heard a Seal Bark"
The Bloodhound and the Bug
from Men, Women and Dogs
"This is Not the Real Me You're Seeing, Mrs. Clisbie"
"What's Come Over You Since Friday, Miss Schemke?"
"Hello, Darling--Woolgathering?"
"It's a Naive Domestic Burgundy Without Any Breeding, But I Think You'll Be Amused by Its Presumption"
"Oh, Doctor Conroy--Look!"
"I'd Feel a Great Deal Easier If Her Husband Hadn't Gone to Bed"
"Touche!"
"And This Is Tom Weatherby, an Old Beau of Your Mother's. He Never Got to First Base"
"Perhaps This Will Refresh Your Memory"
"... And Keep Me a Normal, Healthy, American Girl"
"It's Parkins, Sir; We're 'Aving a Bit of a Time Below Stairs"
"Darling, I Seem to Have This Rabbit"
"That's My First Wife Up There, and This Is the Present Mrs. Harris"
"You're Not My Patient, You're My Meat, Mrs. Quist!"
"She Has the True Emily Dickinson Spirit Except That She Gets Fed Up Occasionally"
"I Said the Hounds of Spring Are on Winter's Traces--But Let It Pass, Let It Pass!"
"For Heaven's Sake, Why Don't You Go Outdoors and Trace Something?"
"I Don't Want Him to Be Comfortable If He's Going to Look Too Funny."
"Yoo-hoo, It's Me and the Ape Man"
"Look Out! Here They Come Again!"
"You Wait Here and I'll Bring the Etchings Down"
"Well, Who Made the Magic Go Out of Our Marriage--You or Me?"
House and Woman
"Well, If I Called the Wrong Number, Why Did You Answer the Phone?"
"This Gentleman Was Kind Enough to See Me Home, Darling"
"I Come From Haunts of Coot and Hern!"
"Well, I'm Disenchanted, Too. We're All Disenchanted"
"What Do You Want to Be Inscrutable for, Marcia?"
"You Said a Moment Ago That Everybody You Look at Seems to Be a Rabbit. Now Just What Do You Mean by That, Mrs. Sprague?"
"Why, I Never Dreamed Your Union Had Been Blessed With Issue!"
"Have You Seen My Pistol, Honey-bun?"
"It's Our Own Story Exactly! He Bold as a Hawk, She Soft as the Dawn"
"You and Your Premonitions!"
"All Right, All Right, Try It That Way! Go Ahead and Try It That Way!"
"Well, It Makes a Difference to Me!"
"There's No Use You Trying to Save Me, My Good Man"
Man in Tree
"What Have You Done With Dr. Millmoss?"
The War Between Men and Women
About James Thurber
The Thurber Carnival, 1945

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