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    White Heat Cold Logic British Computer Art, 1960-1980

    ISBN-10: 0262026538
    ISBN-13: 9780262026536
    Author(s): Paul Brown, Charlie Gere, Nicholas Lambert, Catherine Mason
    Description: Technological optimism, even utopianism, was widespread at midcentury; in Britain, Harold Wilson in 1963 promised a new nation "t;forged from the white heat of the technological revolution."t; In this heady atmosphere, pioneering artists transformed  More...
    List price: $44.95
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    List Price: $44.95
    Publisher: MIT Press
    Binding: Hardcover
    Pages: 464
    Size: 7.00" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
    Weight: 1.980
    Language: English

    Technological optimism, even utopianism, was widespread at midcentury; in Britain, Harold Wilson in 1963 promised a new nation "t;forged from the white heat of the technological revolution."t; In this heady atmosphere, pioneering artists transformed the cold logic of computing into a new medium for their art, and played a central role in connecting technology and culture. White Heat Cold Logictells the story of these early British digital and computer artists--and fills in a missing chapter in contemporary art history. In this heroic period of computer art, artists were required to build their own machines, collaborate closely with computer scientists, and learn difficult computer languages. White Heat Cold Logic'schapters, many written by computer art pioneers themselves, describe the influence of cybernetics, with its emphasis on process and interactivity; the connections to the constructivist movement; and the importance of work done in such different venues as commercial animation, fine art schools, and polytechnics. The advent of personal computing and graphical user interfaces in 1980 signaled the end of an era, and today we do not have so many dreams of technological utopia. And yet our highly technologized and mediated world owes much to these early practitioners, especially for expanding our sense of what we can do with new technologies. Paul Brown is Visiting Professor of Art and Technology at the University of Sussex. Charlie Gere is Reader in New Media Research, Institute for Cultural Research, at Lancaster University. Nicholas Lambert is Research Officer, School of History of Art, Film, and Visual Media, at Birkbeck College, University of London. Catherine Mason is an art historian at work on a book about computers and artistic practice in art schools and academic institutions. Contributors: Roy Ascott, Stephen Bell, Paul Brown, Stephen Bury, Harold Cohen, Ernest Edmonds, Mara Fernndez, Simon Ford, John Hamilton Frazer, Jeremy Gardiner, Charlie Gere, Adrian Glew, Beryl Graham, Stan Hayward, Grisham Howard, Richard Ihnatowicz, Malcolm Le Grice, Tony Longson, Brent MacGregor, George Mallen, Catherine Mason, Jasia Reichardt, Stephen A. R. Scrivener, Brian Reffin Smith, Alan Sutcliffe, Doron D. Swade, John Vince, Richard Wright, Aleksandar Zivanovic. A Leonardo Book

    Nicholas A. Lambert is Associate Fellow of the Royal United Services Institute, Whitehall, London. His first book, Sir John Fisher's Naval Revolution, won the Distinguished Book Prize from the Society for Military History.

    Catherine Mason is an art historian at work on a book about computers and artistic practice in art schools and academic institutions.

    Series Foreword
    Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    Creative Cybernetics: The Emergence of an Art Based on Interaction, Process, and System
    Transmitting Art Triggers: The Early Interactive Work of Stephen Willats
    Interactive Architecture
    "Aesthetically Potent Environments," or How Gordon Pask Detourned Instrumental Cybernetics
    In the Beginning ...
    Cybernetic Serendipity Revisited
    The Technologies of Edward Ihnatowicz
    Forty Is a Dangerous Age: A Memoir of Edward Ihnatowicz
    From System to Software: Computer Programming and the Death of Constructivist Art
    Reconfiguring
    Reconstruction
    Technological Kindergarten: Gustav Metzger and Early Computer Art
    Patterns in Context
    Bridging Computing in the Arts and Software Development
    Two Cultures: Computer Art and the Science Museum
    Never the Same Again
    Which Art in Heaven
    The Routes toward British Computer Arts: The Role of Cultural Institutions in the Pioneering Period
    From Machine to Metaphor: Artists and Computers at Chelsea School of Art 1960-1980
    From Systems Art to Artificial Life: Early Generative Art at the Slade School of Fine Art
    Connections: A Personal History of Computer Art Making from 1971 to 1981
    My First Brush with Computer Graphics
    Conceptual Art, Language, Diagrams, and Indexes
    Constructive Computation
    PICASO at Middlesex Polytechnic
    From 0 to 1: Art Made between the Times of Having and Not Having a Computer
    The Aftermath of Early Computer Art: A Painter's Odyssey
    The Ironic Heirs to Serendipity: British New Media Art, 1980s to Now
    List of Contributors and Editors
    Index

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